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Under $1000 price range, the mid-range DSLR cameras are available which can be used for low light photography. The camera resolution of 10 Megapixel supports you some of the features like ultra-zooming capabilities for professional photography providing the excellent quality prints.

Browse All Top 10 Megapixel Digital Cameras Under $1000 »

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II


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Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7
Panasonic Lumix GF7
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5
Leica D-Lux (Typ 109)
Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7
Panasonic Lumix GF7
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5
Leica D-Lux (Typ 109)
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Release Date
Mar 2015
Jun 2015
Dec 2014
Oct 2014
Nov 2014
Resolution
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
13.0 Megapixel
Camera Type
SLR-style mirrorless
SLR-style mirrorless
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Large sensor compact
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
21.64 mm
21.64 mm
21.64 mm
21.64 mm
21.64 mm

  • The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II has a unique high-resolution capture mode, but it's not the best camera for shooting fast-moving subjects.


  • It may look similar to the 3-year-old EM-5, but with a plethora of "under-the-hood" improvements, the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II far surpasses that camera, and in some ways the flagship OM-D E-M1 too.
    Although not quite as easy to use as the slightly larger Olympus OM-D E-M1, the E-M5 Mark II's revised control layout is well thought-out and the level of customisability is extremely high. The camera is robust – more so than the E-M5 –, and highly responsive. The EVF is among the best we have ever used, with great resolution, good colour rendition, fast refresh rates, a large apparent size and adaptive brightness control.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is a high-quality, compact ILC made to be easy enough for anyone to use. High-quality still images combined with the easy-to-use video features mean this is the only camera you will need. .


  • The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 is the fifth Panasonic stills camera to offer 4K video and photo shooting, following in the footsteps of the GH4, LX100, FZ1000 and CM1 models. "Introducing 4k to everyone" is the marketing angle that Panasonic are taking with the G7, and we'd agree that this DSLR-like, mid-range compact system camera is the best suited of all those products to expand the appeal of 4K to a wider audience, especially as it now offers additional 4K photo modes.


  • While the G7's design and build may lack the excitement of cameras like the Fuji X-T10, it has a very well-rounded feature set, with a high-quality OLED viewfinder, a vari-angle touchscreen and Wi-Fi connectivity. Image quality is also high.


  • Let's not beat about the bush; Panasonic's Lumix G7 is nearly the perfect interchangeable-lens camera for the majority of users. It's well-built, fairly compact and light, very fast, takes beautiful photos, is gifted in video (4K/UHD!), offers great customizability... It's hard to think of any flaws! All we'd say is that, because Panasonic was so keen that its G7 should do everything well, it perhaps offers a few too many options... Not much of a criticism, really!.


  • Smaller, lighter and better looking than its predecessor, the new Panasonic Lumix GF7 is an that's particularly well-suited to its target audience of smartphone/entry-level compact camera owners looking for better image quality and more features.
    The GF7's increased focus on taking better selfies is no gimmick, with the tilting screen and a range of genuinely useful modes on offer to make it easier to take them, improve them and share them.


  • Familiar fantastic Panasonic image quality in a fun, light and easy-to use body with a tilting touchscreen and Wi-Fi.


  • The Panasonic Lumix GF7 gets plenty right, delivering an affordable, easy-to-use entry-level system that's not trying to reinvent the wheel, but build upon the series' heritage. Solid image quality in good light, a decent autofocus system that's hard to beat, improved Wi-Fi and, of course, that tilt-angle selfie screen are all successes in their own right.


  • Like its predecessor, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 packs an image sensor that's much larger than you'd expect, resulting in a pocket-friendly camera that can go toe to toe with larger interchangeable lens models in terms of image quality.


  • Yes, the current cheapest option at £700 might seem a lot of money for a smaller that average compact system camera that as a result resembles a stylish point-and-shooter at first glance. And yet, if compared with the likes of the Sony RX100 Mark III available at a similar outlay – which, while excellent, doesn’t offer the opportunity to swap lenses – then the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 starts to make a lot more sense as a proposition in the present market.


  • Superb image quality from a fantastic feat of camera engineering - perhaps the ultimate carry everywhere camera.


  • With very few differences between the Leica D-Lux (Typ 109) and the virtually identical
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100
    that we so enthusiastically reviewed back in October 2014, the choice between these two excellent cameras essentially comes down to four things - the overall cost, the inclusion of Lightroom and a longer warranty with the Leica, the handgrip on the Panasonic, and of course that famous Leica red dot. For us, the lack of any sort of handgrip on the Leica D-Lux (Typ 109) makes it harder, although certainly not impossible, to get a firm grip on the camera.


  • The D-Lux is a delight to use and it produces high quality images, but the Panasonic LX100, which has the same spec, feels safer in your hand thanks to the front grip that's missing from the Leica camera.