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Panasonic HDC-TM900K
Panasonic HDC-SD800
Panasonic HDC-HS60
Panasonic HDC-HS100
Sony HVR-Z7
Panasonic HDC-TM900K Camcorder
Panasonic HDC-SD800 Camcorder
Panasonic HDC-HS60 High Definition Flash Media  Hard Drive Camcorder
Panasonic HDC-HS100 60GB Hard Drive HD Camcorder
Sony HVR-Z7U DV Camcorder
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Release Date
Jan 2011
Apr 2011
Jan 2010
Sep 2008
Jun 2003
Recording Format
Flash Media, High Definition, AVC, H.264, MPEG
Flash Media, High Definition
Flash Media, High Definition, Hard Drive
High Definition, Hard Drive, AVCHD
DV, High Definition
CCD Quantity
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
HDD Size
32.0 GB
120.0 GB
60.0 GB
Optical Zoom
12.0 x
12.0 x
25.0 x
12.0 x
12.0 x
Recording System
NTSC
NTSC
NTSC
PAL
NTSC
Camcorder Type
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
Memory Still Resolution
14.2 MegaPixels
2.63 MegaPixels
5.04 MegaPixels
2.1 MegaPixels
Recordable Media
Flash Media
Flash Media, High Definition
High Definition, Hard Drive, AVCHD
DV, High Definition
Use
Video
Video

  • Panasonic's trio of prosumer camcorders, the hard-disk-based HDC-HS900 and flash-based TM900 and SD800, deliver generally excellent video quality and provide the full set of manual controls and features advanced users want. But you have to be willing to baby the white balance a bit. The TM900 is my top pick of the three for its EVF, but if you're on a tight budget the SD800 should suit just fine.


  • The HDC-TM900 (MSRP $1099) is a great camcorder, that much is clear. It captured excellent video in a variety of record modes, and its performance recording 1080/60p HD video was as good as it gets. It has a ton of controls, a solid body design, and its 3D recording option (with the purchase of an optional conversion lens) makes it a cutting-edge product.

    Despite all this, we are still disappointed with the TM900. Other than adding the 3D capability and increasing the size of the LCD, Panasonic didn't do much to improve on last year's HDC-TM700â??


  • Panasonic's HDC-TM900 offers no revolutionary new features, now that 3D shooting has already started its journey to ubiquity. But like its predecessors it blends excellent enthusiast features, headlined by the lens ring, with supreme image quality. There's also no significant premium being charged for this new model compared to the outgoing TM700, if you can still find it. So the TM900 takes over from its predecessor as our videomaking enthusiast camcorder of choice.


  • Panasonic's trio of prosumer camcorders, the hard-disk-based HDC-HS900 and flash-based TM900 and SD800, deliver generally excellent video quality and provide the full set of manual controls and features advanced users want. But you have to be willing to baby the white balance a bit. The TM900 is my top pick of the three for its EVF, but if you're on a tight budget the SD800 should suit just fine.


  • The Panasonic HDC-SD800 is an upper mid-cost camcorder. With its 3CMOS sensor (which operates with 7.59 million effective pixels), this camcorder can capture full HD 1080/60p video at 1920 x 1080 resolution.


  • The Panasonic HDC-800 shoots good quality 1080/60p video, but is missing some features you would expect from an $849.99 camcorder.


  • Panasonic's quartet of entry-level HD camcorders--the HDC-HS60, TM60, TM55, and SD60--deliver a nice manual feature set and good performance, as well as solid video quality for their class. As long as you don't pay list price, the SD60 is a great value, and if possible, avoid paying the unnecessary price premium for the hard drive in the HS60.

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    Panasonic definitely impressed us with the improvements it made with the HDC-HS60 (MSRP $699.95). The camcorder was a much stronger performer than Panasonic's crop of mid-range models from last year, and it often matched or exceeded the performance of the Canon HF20 and JVC GZ-HD300â??two of our favorite mid-range models from 2009.


  • The HDC-SD60 has a nice manual feature set and good performance, as well as solid video quality for its class. The HDC-SD60 has a nice manual feature set and good performance, as well as solid video quality for its class.The HDC-SD60 has a nice manual feature set and good performance, as well as solid video quality for its class.

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    - The ring isn't perfect, however.
    - The placement of the mode dial and Record Start/Stop button is highly conducive to the natural position of the thumb.


  • - I'm glad to say that the newer Panasonic HDC-HS100 HD camcorder is a better camera than the HS9, with improved image quality and great usability.

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    - Audio captures in Dolby Digital 5.1 and sounds very clear.


  • The lofty price of the HVR-Z7E will put it out of the reach of all but the most serious videomakers. Corporate and events cameramen will long for it, but may struggle to justify the expense. Nevertheless, it points the way forward for professional camcorders, particularly now Panasonic has announced that more models using AVCHD and SD will be arriving later in 2008. Sony's embracing of solid state recording is a sign of how tape's days as a primary recording medium are numbered, even if it's still the most cost effective choice for long-term archiving.


Top 5 3ccd hd camcorder:

  1. Panasonic HDC-TM900K Camcorder
  2. Panasonic HDC-SD800 Camcorder
  3. Panasonic HDC-HS60 High Definition Flash Media Hard Drive Camcorder
  4. Panasonic HDC-HS100 60GB Hard Drive HD Camcorder
  5. Sony HVR-Z7U DV Camcorder