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Sony, like Samsung and Panasonic had always supported Active 3D technology through which you can view 3D in its full intended resolution, as opposed to Passive 3D which scales it down to half. In 2102, Sony began to drift from their Active 3D stance and began coming out with passive 3D TVs too. The best 3D TVs from Sony are still their Active 3D models, although their prices are steeper than the passive 3D models. To know more about Active/Passive 3D, visit our 3D TV guide.

Sony 3D TVs come in typically 3 sizes: 55", 65" and a giant 84", and are all Full HD 1080p LED TVs. The LED backlighting however, can be of two types, Direct-lit, where the LEDs are right behind the display panel, and edge-lit, where the LEDs are placed around the 4 sides of the display panel. Direct-lit LED TVs are claimed to have superior contrast levels and crisper images than their edge-lit counterparts, so that's what we're going to suggest you look for.

Sony 3D LED TVs have a high refresh rate of 240Hz and wide viewing angles along with excellent picture quality for a great 3D HD experience. What's more, these TVs are also SmartTVs with Full Web browsers and Skype compatibility to take internet browsing to the next level. Our list of the best Sony 3D TVs is a consensus of expert reviews and provides specs, reviews and buying options to ease out your purchase.

Browse All Top 3D Sony TV »

Sony KDL-W900A

Sony KDL-55W900A 55-Inch 240Hz 1080p 3D Internet LED HDTV


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Sony KDL-W900A
Sony KDL-W802A
Sony XBR-X900A
Sony KDL-R550A
Sony XBR HX950
Sony KDL-55W900A 55-Inch 240Hz 1080p 3D Internet LED HDTV
Sony KDL-55W802A 55-Inch 120Hz 1080p 3D Internet LED HDTV
Sony XBR-55X900A 55 in. 3D LED TV
Sony KDL-70R550A 70-Inch 1080p 3D LED HDTV
Sony XBR-55HX950 LED TV
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Release Date
Jan 2013
Jan 2013
Apr 2013
Jan 2013
Aug 2012
3D-ready
3D-ready
3D-ready
3D-ready
3D-ready
3D-ready
Contrast Ratio
over 1 million
Over 1 million
1, 000, 000:1
Over 1 million
Digital TV Standard
HDTV Television
HDTV Television
HDTV Television
HDTV Television
Flat Panel Type
LED TV
LED TV
LED TV
LED TV
Screen Size
55.0 inch
55.0 inch
55.0 inch
70.0 inch
55.0 inch
Aspect Ratio
16:9
16:9
Widescreen (16:9)
16:9
Widescreen (16:9)
DLNA Certified
DLNA Certified
DLNA Certified
DLNA Certified

  • The Sony W900A is a fine high-end LED LCD television, with excellent color performance and deep black levels.


  • Sony still doesn't - get it - in terms of smart features, but proves it knows exactly what it's doing in regards to picture quality. Color accuracy, motion performance, contrast - they're all superb on the W900A. And don't get me started on design, which is becoming a staple of Sony's products.

    So what's there to dislike? As mentioned before, this TV's viewing angle isn't terribly wide. Then there's the whole issue of price: With an MSRP of $3,299.99, the 55-inch W900A is not for those short on cash.


  • The LED edge-lit KDL-55W900A wears the crown in Sony's 2013 line of HDTVs and rightfully so with its color rich TRILUMINOS display and wealth of streaming content partners. At 55 inches, this Sony is a serious contender as the cornerstone of your home theater.

    I wish it were a little less expensive, but its combination of features and Picture Quality earns it our HDTV Solutions Highly Recommended rating.


  • The Sony W802A LED LCD delivers lots of style and features, but its picture quality is only decent at this price.


  • We may be halfway through 2013, but Sony is just getting started with its TV lineup. If the W802A is any indication, this is going to be a good year for the Japanese electronics giant.

    There are many things to like about the W802A: It looks good enough to make your in-laws jealous, it produces a solid picture, and has vastly improved smart features compared to last year. So is this the right TV for you? That depends on how much you're willing to spend.


  • The Sony W802A series of LED-lit LCD HDTVs performs well, but you can find other models that offer better performance for the price - or a lower price for similar performance.


  • If you're going to purchase a TV in the R550A series, do so because you need a media-hosting device, or are particularly attuned to 3D movies. The 50R550A has plenty to tweak to make the picture better, but the bottom line is that it does not have the dynamic power to create a majestic image, and no amount of fiddling will fix that.

    There are plenty of smart, 3D, lower-performance 50-inch TVs available this year and last year for less than $1000.

  • Rating Unavailable

    If you've read all of the above and decided to buy this TV, Sony's list pricing might give you pause. The 55-inch XBR-55HX950 costs a cool $3,499, while the 65-inch XBR-65HX950 will run you $5,499. By way of comparison, the 55-inch HX929 can be had for $2,999 now -- it's a tough call whether there's $500 worth of picture quality difference between the two, at least until I can review the HX950. Unlike the HX929, the HX950 series will not offer a 46-inch size.

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    Sony fans may be willing to shell out the $5000 plus for this HDTV. It will yield an exceptional picture quality. This is the only full array 65" LED TV in the market as of this writing. The closest is a LG 60" 60LM9600. Although this Sony seems expensive it may look appetizingly cheap to those looking at the new OLED or 4K TVs coming out later this year.


  • The Sony Bravia XBR-55HX950 (MSRP $3,499) is worthy of being called a flagship television. Sony crafted a gem of a TV with only a few minor problems: the narrow viewing angle, the clunky menu interface, and the confusing smart platform. Other than these missteps, the HX950 was a pleasure to use.

    We could go on about how the colors looked great and how, despite the confusing way of accessing it, the smart platform offers a wealth of streaming content, but those features only help to make the HX950 a good TV.