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The best advanced point and shoot cameras provide you the more manual controls, and features than the normal point and shoot cameras at a higher cost. The higher-end hardware and features found on these cameras introduce versatility to point and shoot cameras along with the improved speed and quality.

Designed basically for simple operation and to support portability, the compact cameras for advanced point and shoot photography are found to be most useful during parties and vacations, and function as alternative to professional DSLRs sometimes. Without missing the compact nature and ease of use, the best advanced point and shoot cameras offer you manual controls like aperture setting, ISO and shutter speed found in DSLRs.

Unlike the DSLRs, the advanced point and shoot cameras still use electronic viewfinders to preview the image you are shooting, and do not support interchangeable lens - instead the high-end point and shoot cameras rely on the features like auto focusing and automatic exposure options.

Some of the other features supported by the advanced point and shoot cameras include HD video recording in 720p and 1080p format (prefer 720p for easier online sharing), optical image stabilization (useful when the camera isn't stable) and touch screen interface.

Browse All Top Advanced Point And Shoot Camera »

Canon PowerShot G16

Canon PowerShot G16 Digital Camera


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Canon PowerShot G16
Canon PowerShot G15
Fujifilm XF1
Panasonic LUMIX DMC-LX7
Canon PowerShot S90
Canon PowerShot G16 Digital Camera
Canon PowerShot G15 Digital Camera
Fujifilm XF1 Digital Camera
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7W Digital Camera
Canon PowerShot S90 Black Digital Camera
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Release Date
Aug 2013
Sep 2012
Sep 2012
Jul 2012
Oct 2009
Camera Type
Standard Point and Shoot, Compact
Standard Point and Shoot, Compact
Compact, Standard Point and Shoot
Compact, Standard Point and Shoot
Compact, Standard Point and Shoot
Optical Zoom
5.0 x
5.0 x
4.0 x
3.8 x
3.8 x
Resolution
12.0 Megapixel
12.1 Megapixel
12.0 Megapixel
10.1 Megapixel
10.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS, BSI-CMOS
CMOS
EXR CMOS
CMOS
CCD
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
1.97 mm
9.5 mm
11.0 mm
9.5 mm

  • While the Canon PowerShot G16 is better than the G15 and remains a nice enthusiast compact, its low-light photo quality disappoints for the money.


  • The Canon PowerShot G16 offers an impressive control layout and Wi-Fi, but its underwhelming optical viewfinder disappoints.


  • The price of the Canon PowerShot G16 is an eye-watering £529.00 / $549.99, which makes it more expensive than the class-leading Sony Cyber-shot RX100, itself bested by the RX100 Mark II, albeit at an even higher price-point. Despite the improvements, we still feel that the RX100/RX100 II with its much larger sensor delivers even better results than the G16, making it our choice in the "pocketable compact camera for enthusiasts" sector of the market.


  • The Canon PowerShot G15 continues the G-series tradition of solid advanced compacts, but doesn't rank as best in class by any particular measure.


  • The enthusiast-focused Canon PowerShot G15 delivers excellent image quality, but lacks some features found in other top-end cameras.


  • On the whole, we're thrilled with the G15's performance. It's a bold return to (most of) what made the G-series so great in the first place. In the future, we hope Canon will take a long hard look at the larger sensors found in some competing models and give some thought to merging the two tiers they've created with the G15 and G1 X, but for the time being, the company has set itself firmly on a path toward re-conquering the market.


  • The Fujifilm XF1 offers a similar retro feel, solid build and excellent image quality as its bigger X-series relatives at a cheaper price, but some of the features are less well-realised with style often winning out over substance.


  • The XF1 enters a competitive field in the form of the enthusiast compact market, where it primarily distinguishes itself from its peers through its smart, retro design. The camera's leather and matte aluminium finish, along with the manual zoom operation make the XF1 a pleasing camera to hold and use. Retract the lens fully and the camera can also be easily pocketed. Despite these obvious pluses, the XG1 is not without its faults.


  • We have handfuls of love for the XF1 thanks to its decent image quality, collapsible manual zoom lens, competitive price and retro, pocketable design. But that's met with a few pinches of disappointment too: the maximum f/4.9 aperture at the full extent of the zoom, lack of optional viewfinder, ongoing "white orb" issues due to the sensor and that not-so-nice faux-leather finish. It's close, but the cigar's not quite met the lips of this otherwise good-looking and decent-performing high-end compact.


  • Priced at around &poundl;449.99 / $499.95, the LX7 is another recent high-end model that further blurs the line between compact and larger-sensor cameras. Consumers have never had so much choice at this price-point - premium compact, mid-range compact system camera and even an entry-level DSLR are all available.

  • Rating Unavailable

    Overall, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 is an excellent premium compact camera. Its fast lens, performance, and manual controls will make enthusiasts drool, while those just starting out can get great results using Panasonic's Intelligent Auto mode. There's very little to dislike about the LX7, with my main issues being redeye, slow buffer flush times when shooting RAW images, and vertical lines in panoramas. Aside from that, the LX7 is a first-rate camera that I can highly recommend.


  • Overall, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 is an excellent premium compact camera. Its fast lens, performance, and manual controls will make enthusiasts drool, while those just starting out can get great results using Panasonic's Intelligent Auto mode. There's very little to dislike about the LX7, with my main issues being redeye, slow buffer flush times when shooting RAW images, and vertical lines in panoramas. Aside from that, the LX7 is a first-rate camera that I can highly recommend.

  • Rating Unavailable

    Canon gets extremely close to the ideal pocket camera with the PowerShot S90, close enough that a great majority of users will be extremely happy with it. These fall into two groups: those content to shoot primarily in Auto mode, as we're all pretty used to doing with pocket cameras, and those willing and able to take their time with the very capable Canon S90.


  • As long as you're not expecting dSLR speed in a tiny body, the Canon PowerShot S90 is an excellent compact camera for advanced amateurs.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - It has a combination metal/plastic exterior that feels pretty solid.
    - The S90 is fairly heavy for its size.
    - It measures 3.9x2.3x1.2 inches and it weighs 6.17 ounces - not an ultracompact, but comfortable to carry.
    - The Canon PowerShot S90 is a fairly small camera with a smooth finish that makes it easy to slide in and out of a pocket or a purse.


Top 5 advanced point and shoot camera:

  1. Canon PowerShot G16 Digital Camera
  2. Canon PowerShot G15 Digital Camera
  3. Fujifilm XF1 Digital Camera
  4. Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7W Digital Camera
  5. Canon PowerShot S90 Black Digital Camera