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Our picks of the best basic Sprint cellphones is narrowed down to the cellphones which have screen size up to 2.2 inch and basic features like voice calling and text messaging. Some of the best cellphones running on Sprint's CDMA network come from Brands like Samsung and Nokia under $100.

Browse All Top Basic Sprint Cell Phones »

Kyocera Verve

Kyocera Verve


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Kyocera Verve
Sonim XP STRIKE
Nokia N95-3G
Nokia N95
Samsung Array M390
Kyocera Verve
Sonim XP STRIKE Phone
Nokia N95-3G Cell Phone
Nokia N95 Cellular Phone
Samsung Array M390
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Release Date
May 2014
Dec 2012
Sep 2007
Feb 2007
Sep 2012
Carrier
Sprint
Sprint
AT-T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile
AT-T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile
Sprint
Input Method
Keypad
Keypad
Control Pad, Keypad, Multimedia Keys
Control Pad, Keypad, Multimedia Keys
Keypad

  • The fun-looking Kyocera Verve delivers the bare-bone basics of a feature phone well, and its ability to easily transfer its photos will satisfy casual shutterbugs.


  • While the Sonim XP Strike is tough as nails, Sprint has other rugged devices that are better not only in performance, but in price too.


  • Sonim has made a very basic phone that aims to do one thing well: withstand punishment. The XP Strike won't win any beauty contests, the OS is slow and dated and the camera is horrible. None of that matters, but what does is that it was able to withstand our testing, which at times went above and beyond what it is rated for. Sonim has is a seriously tough phone for seriously tough users that may be more rugged than anything the famed Nextel lineup ever offered.


  • It doesn't do much more than make calls, but the Sonim XP Strike is Sprint's toughest push-to-talk cell phone.

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    - Sure, the N95 is a perfectly fine phone, but that's not why it's so expensive.
    - The phone's GPS mapping is gorgeous, its Web browser sublime, and its 3D games will knock your socks off.
    - The handset is handsome too, with a curved purple back and a silver face.
    - The quad-band N95 gets very good reception on both Cingular's and T-Mobile's networks.

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    - In hand, the unit feels surprisingly light.
    - One of the first things we noticed is the sharp 2.6-inch 240 x 320-pixel screen.


  • - FM radio is built-in, with an app that can download local frequencies and radio call letters.
    - The Nokia N95 makes calls that sound great.
    - The contact list is more robust even than Outlook, with three fields each for Internet and Video calling numbers, as well as a slot for Assistant's name and Assistant's phone number.
    - Video looked very good as well.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - Sure, the N95 is a perfectly fine phone, but that's not why it's so expensive.
    - The phone's GPS mapping is gorgeous, its Web browser sublime, and its 3D games will knock your socks off.
    - The handset is handsome too, with a curved purple back and a silver face.
    - The quad-band N95 gets very good reception on both Cingular's and T-Mobile's networks.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - In hand, the unit feels surprisingly light.
    - One of the first things we noticed is the sharp 2.6-inch 240 x 320-pixel screen.


  • - FM radio is built-in, with an app that can download local frequencies and radio call letters.
    - The Nokia N95 makes calls that sound great.
    - The contact list is more robust even than Outlook, with three fields each for Internet and Video calling numbers, as well as a slot for Assistant's name and Assistant's phone number.
    - Video looked very good as well.


  • The Samsung Array excels at communication, but anyone wanting more out of a phone should look elsewhere.


  • The Samsung Array is a simple keyboarded phone for Sprint users, but there's only so much you can do with it.


  • So just what kind of room is the Samsung Array trying to play to? There's an aging generation of users still buying basic phones to stay connected on the go, although many of them lack a QWERTY keyboard for more efficient text messaging.
    In the grand scheme of things, 20 bucks is cheap for something that would have cost hundreds just a few years ago. But given the pace of innovation with mobile devices today, hitching your wagon to the Samsung Array for the next two years just doesn't make a lot of sense to us.