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The best cameras for your grandparents have been listed below and these top-rated models have lightweight bodies and bright LCD screen of over 3 inch size for easier and clear viewing of captured media. Most of these cameras are the standard point and shoot models with features like over 6x optical zoom and Full HD video recording. The best cameras for grandparents are available from Panasonic, Canon and Sony under the Lumix, Powershot and Cyber-shot product lines under the $350 price range.

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Fuji XQ2

Fujifilm XQ2


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Fujifilm XQ2
Canon PowerShot SX610 HS
Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ57
Canon PowerShot SX700 HS
Nikon 1 J4
Fujifilm XQ2
Canon PowerShot SX610 HS
Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ57
Canon PowerShot SX700 HS
Nikon 1 J4
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Release Date
Mar 2015
Apr 2015
Mar 2015
Apr 2014
May 2014
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Weight
0.45 lb.
0.42 lb.
0.55 lb.
0.59 lb.
0.51 lb.
Camera Type
Ultracompact
Compact
Compact
Compact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Optical Zoom
4.0 x
18.0 x
20.0 x
30.0 x
Resolution
12.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
Image Sensor Size
3.6 mm
2.5 mm
2.53 mm
2.5 mm
13.23 mm

  • The Fujifilm XQ2 is a pocket-friendly camera that is capable of capturing excellent images.


  • Calling the Fujifilm XQ2 a modest upgrade is something of an understatement - it's identical to the original XQ1 camera, except for a faster image proccesor, new Classic Chrome film simulation, new white colour-way, and a slightly lower official price on launch. In all other respects, it's impossible to tell the two cameras apart, which is disappointing given the 18-month gap between them, and ultimately means that Fujifilm's premium compact camera has fallen some way behind the fast-moving competition.


  • A thoroughly enjoyable camera to use. It does everything pretty well but falls short of challenging the very best in its class – a 1-inch sensor, better lens and a tilting touch-screen would potentially make the difference.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX610 HS is an attractive compact camera with an 18x zoom lens, but image quality takes a step back from last year's edition.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX610 HS is a well-designed camera that’s easy to use thanks to its chunky, ergonomic build, and an intuitive menu design. You can also be sure it’ll snap accurately focussed and well exposed shots.
    Performance and image quality are also good, though not outstanding. The switch to a 20.2-megaixel sensor sounds great on paper, but in reality the camera can only resolve marginally more detail than the 16MP SX600 HS.

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    The Canon PowerShot SX610 HS is the latest basic point-n-shoot model from Canon, but there just isn't much in this camera that will make you take notice of it. The SX610 offers 20.2-megapixels of resolution, but its image quality simply isn't where it should be for a camera with that much resolution and an MSRP of $249. Even under nearly perfect lighting conditions, the PowerShot SX610's image quality isn't good enough to make mid-to-large-sized prints. This model has no manual control features.


  • The Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ57 offers a good range of specifications for the price, coming in at significantly cheaper than its more advanced sibling, the TZ70. That said, if you do have a little more to spend, it’s worth checking out the top of the range camera as you get a fair bit more for the extra cash.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX700 HS has a 30x lens and a lot of features, but image quality suffers in low light.


  • There's a lot to like about Canon's latest flagship travel-zoom compact, but it doesn't offer quite enough features or performance to beat one of its key rivals and our current favourite, the Panasonic DMC-TZ60.
    The Canon PowerShot SX700 HS is simple to operate thanks to intuitive menus and sensible controls, with the ability to take more control via the PASM mode, plus the autofocusing, exposure metering and auto white balance systems all perform admirably.


  • A brilliant camera for holidaying and traveling photographers, while full manual control make it a good choice as a backup compact for DSLR owners.


  • The new Nikon 1 J4 offers a lot of the features from the flagship V3 model at a much more enticing price-point, making it a better-balanced camera that's our pick of the current Nikon 1 line-up.
    The Nikon 1 J4 offers many of the key features of its more expensive and bigger brother, the V3, in a smaller, lighter and simpler package that is clearly targeted at people upgrading from a compact.


  • The J4 performs well and looks good – fans of Nikon will particularly enjoy this camera, while those who aren't can enjoy an easy to use compact system camera.


  • Small, fast and well-made, the Nikon 1 J4 as a lot going for it. However, it’s not great at dealing with more challenging lighting and general image quality can’t touch the best at the price.