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The best Canon bridge cameras are being released under the Powershot product line and can be availed at a price at least $500. The bridge cameras from Canon offer portability along with manual controls. The below listed top-rated models are the intermediate cameras which effective fill the functionality gap between point and shoot cameras and DSLRs. These cameras are also equipped with ultra-zooming capabilities and can capture images of at least 10 Megapixel resolution.

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Canon PowerShot G3 X
Canon PowerShot SX60 HS
Canon PowerShot SX50 HS
Canon PowerShot SX40 HS
Canon PowerShot SX1 IS
Canon PowerShot G3 X
Canon PowerShot SX60 HS
Canon PowerShot SX50 HS Camera With Kit
Canon PowerShot SX40 HS Digital Camera
Canon PowerShot SX1 IS Black Digital Camera
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Release Date
Jul 2015
Oct 2014
Sep 2012
Aug 2011
Aug 2009
Camera Type
SLR-like (bridge)
SLR-like (bridge)
Standard Point and Shoot, SLR-like (bridge)
Standard Point and Shoot, Light Field Camera, SLR-like (bridge)
SLR-like (bridge)
Optical Zoom
25.0 x
65.0 x
50.0 x
35.0 x
20.0 x
Resolution
20.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
12.1 Megapixel
12.1 Megapixel
10.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
2.8 in.
2.7 in.
2.8 in.
Image Sensor Size
13.23 mm
2.5 mm
7.66 mm
7.66 mm

  • The new Canon PowerShot G3 X is a solid super-zoom camera for enthusiast photographers, offering a wealth of options for shooting both stills and video, excellent image quality, speedy auto-focusing, intuitive and configurable handling, and solid construction. Unfortunately, it's rather ham-strung by the strange omission of a built-in viewfinder - trying to hold the Canon PowerShot G3 X at arm's length whilst using the full extent of the 25x zoom lens results in too many misses due to camerashake.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Canon PowerShot G3 X certainly has some of the same drawbacks that you find with other fixed lens, large zoom cameras, but its extremely good image quality more than makes up for those issues. Add in a tiltable, high-resolution, touch screen LCD, a 25x optical zoom lens, a good mix of manual control and auto shooting modes, and great battery life, and the G3 X is a really good camera.


  • The G3 X delivers SLR-like zoom capabilities in a compact package thanks to its excellent lens and image stabilisation, only falling down when faced with fast-moving subjects. It's not a beautiful camera, but it's well built and easy to handle.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX60 HS has a lens that covers an extreme zoom range, and even though it's on the pricey side, it earns our Editors' Choice award.


  • Its fusion of comprehensive control with numerous creative effects helps this, as do features like its fold-out LCD screen and good quality electronic viewfinder.
    But where the camera really scores is image quality. Considering the inherent limitations of its small sensor, the SX60 HS manages to produce images with impressively low noise levels at all of its ISO sensitivity settings. Colour, dynamic range and exposure metering are superb too.
    Downsides?

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Canon Powershot SX60 HS is an impressive ultra-zoom camera, offering a huge 65x optical zoom range. Unlike many big zoom cameras, the SX60 performs pretty quickly and it creates images that are of a surprisingly good quality. There's plenty of nice add-on features here too, with an articulated LCD, a high-quality electronic viewfinder, numerous special effect options, and built-in Wi-Fi and NFC wireless connectivity.


  • If you simply must have the longest zoom in the room, the Canon PowerShot SX50 HS satisfies.


  • So ultimately, aside from that new stabilization feature, and of course breaking the nifty-fifty zoom barrier, there's very little about the SX50 we'd consider revolutionary. Like the SX40, this is basically a consistent, high-performance superzoom, and exactly the kind of camera our scoring system rewards. This is an easy recommendation over just about every competitor on the market.


  • It's impossible to review the Canon PowerShot SX50 HS without focusing on its 24-1200mm focal length - after all, it would be very costly and indeed difficult to replicate that range on a DSLR system, not to mention bulky and heavy too. We found that we got a surprising number of keepers at the 1200mm focal length, even when using the camera handheld, although most of the photos taken at the longer reaches of the zoom were inevitably shot at ISO 1600 when ISO Auto was on, not great considering the high levels of noise.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX40 HS doesn't offer all the bells and whistles of competing full-size megazooms and its shooting performance lags behind them, too. However, it has plenty of positives including some of the best JPEG photo quality you'll find in this class as well as an extraordinarily long lens. If those things matter most to you, the SX40 HS is the way to go.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX40 HS offers an impressive 35x zoom range, fast continuous shooting, and very good image quality. You won't be able to fit it into your pocket, but this megazoom can capture telephoto images that a smaller camera couldn't dream of.


  • Canon's strategy is clear. Start with the framework of the already-excellent PowerShot SX30 IS ultrazoom, swap the CCD sensor with a CMOS model, and ship it. Simple.The experiment is a resounding success. The Canon PowerShot SX40 HS retains everything we loved about its predecessor, while boosting image quality to levels we've not yet seen from a fixed-lens camera. Supporting this is a rich feature set, versatile enough to handle any shooting scenario.


  • A top megazoom option, the Canon PowerShot SX1 IS offers a 20x zoom lens and HD video, which you can't get in a similarly priced dSLR, and delivers more features and slightly better performance and photo quality than the cheaper SX10 IS.


  • - I was less impressed with the electronic viewfinder (EVF).
    - This tiny LCD, mounted where the optical viewfinder usually is, may be a good alternative to an optical viewfinder on a point-and-shooter, but it's nowhere near the quality of a D-SLR's viewfinder.
    - But you shouldn't expect D-SLR performance from the SX1, especially when it comes to image noise.
    - On my tests there was also some chromatic aberration, which suggests that color fringing could be visible in images.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - Styling and Build Quality The composite materials used for the camera body seem on a par for the class and the overall impression of build quality is good.
    - There is some chromatic aberration (purple fringing) present in extreme high contrast boundary areas, but this is a minor concern until image size becomes truly gargantuan.


Top 5 canon bridge camera:

  1. Canon PowerShot G3 X
  2. Canon PowerShot SX60 HS
  3. Canon PowerShot SX50 HS Camera With Kit
  4. Canon PowerShot SX40 HS Digital Camera
  5. Canon PowerShot SX1 IS Black Digital Camera