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So you are a serious photographer, but your budget does not let you indulge. And you also know by now that cameras are simply as good as the user behind the lens, all you want is a better but affordable tool. The best Canon digital cameras under 1000 differ not in technical picture quality, but the kind and number of knobs and buttons on them which allow a professional to derive output that is perfect to the discerning eye. As a prolific photographers you should look for among the best Canon digital cameras costing under 1000 for a model that offers high-quality digital capture and skillful post-processing, full HD video recording, extra manual controls, flexible LCD screens, and also turn out to be easy to carry all day and have worry-free battery life.

Browse All Top Canon Digital Cameras Under $1000 »

Canon EOS 760D

Canon EOS 760D


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Canon EOS 760D
Canon EOS 750D
Canon PowerShot G3 X
Canon EOS 70D
Canon EOS 650D (Rebel T4i)
Canon EOS 760D
Canon EOS 750D
Canon PowerShot G3 X
Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS Rebel T4i Digital Camera with 18-135mm lens
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Release Date
Sep 2015
Jun 2015
Jul 2015
Jun 2013
Jun 2012
Camera Type
Compact SLR
Compact SLR
SLR-like (bridge)
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
26.81 mm
26.81 mm
13.23 mm
27.04 mm
26.7 mm

  • - HDMI output only functions when Wi-Fi/NFC is disabled.
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance settings too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - OVF coverage only 95%, with offset (this will likely change with sample variation).
    - Built-in flash can act as master to off-camera slave flash units.
    - Competitive though unexceptional burst speed for its class.
    - Excellent color and hue accuracy with manual white balance.
    - Very good high ISO performance for a 24-megapixel APS-C model.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - But it’s the 760D’s low noise levels that impress most.
    - The new 24.2MP sensor in the 760D doesn’t just look good on paper; it also generates excellent image quality.
    - Its plastic body is tough and doesn't show any signs of flex, plus you get a generously-sized rubberised rear thumb grip.


  • This camera produces the same superb image quality as the 750D, but its better handling, helpful secondary LCD and electronic level makes it our choice of the two models. It's almost like a smaller, lighter 70D, with a better sensor.


  • - HDMI output only functions when Wi-Fi/NFC is disabled.
    - OVF coverage only 94%, with offset (this will likely change with sample variation).
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance settings too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - The new sensor packs in a lot of resolution and results in very good image quality.
    - Very good high ISO performance for a 24-megapixel APS-C model.
    - OLPF means fewer aliasing artifacts, but images are a bit soft (could be a Pro or Con depending on perspective).


  • The Canon EOS 750D/Rebel T6i marks the tenth generation in a series that started way back in 2003 with the 300D/Rebel. However, each revision hasn’t always brought significant improvements. Whilst the 700D made waves with its touch-screen interface, its sensor dated back three generations to the 550D/Rebel T2i and was now outperformed in resolution and image quality.
    Thankfully the 750D addresses this and is arguably the most significant generational leap forward since the 550D.


  • This is a great camera that's capable of producing superb quality images which have much more detail than the 700D's. The control layout is also almost identical to the previous camera's, making the upgrade very smooth. The 760D, however, offers slightly better handling and would be our preferred choice.


  • The new Canon PowerShot G3 X is a solid super-zoom camera for enthusiast photographers, offering a wealth of options for shooting both stills and video, excellent image quality, speedy auto-focusing, intuitive and configurable handling, and solid construction. Unfortunately, it's rather ham-strung by the strange omission of a built-in viewfinder - trying to hold the Canon PowerShot G3 X at arm's length whilst using the full extent of the 25x zoom lens results in too many misses due to camerashake.

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    The Canon PowerShot G3 X certainly has some of the same drawbacks that you find with other fixed lens, large zoom cameras, but its extremely good image quality more than makes up for those issues. Add in a tiltable, high-resolution, touch screen LCD, a 25x optical zoom lens, a good mix of manual control and auto shooting modes, and great battery life, and the G3 X is a really good camera.


  • The G3 X delivers SLR-like zoom capabilities in a compact package thanks to its excellent lens and image stabilisation, only falling down when faced with fast-moving subjects. It's not a beautiful camera, but it's well built and easy to handle.


  • An overall excellent camera, but one that fails to capture the best-in-class prize for image quality.


  • The Canon EOS 70D delivers the smoothest Live View focus we've seen in a traditional D-SLR, but it can struggle to lock that focus in dim light.


  • Indeed, until we see Dual-Pixel CMOS AF inevitably make its way across the EOS range, we'd recommend the new Canon EOS 70D as the APS-C camera to go for if you're currently considering a mid-range DSLR camera. It offers a winning blend of features, performance and image quality that is hard to beat, both by its EOS brothers and other manufacturers' offerings. The new EOS 70D marks a real step forward for both Canon and the venerable SLR camera.


  • In summary the new 650D / Rebel T4i is the most complicated yet friendly mid-range Canon DSLR yet, truly a camera that you can grow into as your photography skills develop. It only misses out on our highest Essential award because of the still slow Live View auto-focusing and a small price increase over the 600D, but is more than deserving of our still-coveted Highly Recommended award.


  • Although it has an 18 million pixel sensor, Canon's EOS 650D/Rebel T4i doesn't use the same CMOS device as other cameras in Canon's range. It uses a new Hybrid CMOS sensor that is designed to facilitate a combined phase detection and contrast detection autofocus system that operates during video recording and when Live View is activated.


  • With the EOS 650D, Canon faced the challenge of taking an already successful camera line and finding a way to offer more than a token upgrade without stealing too much thunder from its higher-spec'd DSLRs. By maintaining what has long been very good image quality for both stills and video shooting and addressing operational handling with a remarkably well-executed touchscreen implementation, the latest addition to the Rebel lineup carves out a niche as one of the more enjoyable to use entry level DSLRs on the market.