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Canon EOS 70D
Canon EOS 700D (EOS Rebel T5i)
Canon EOS 100D (EOS Rebel SL1)
Canon EOS 6D
Canon EOS 650D (Rebel T4i)
Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS 700D (EOS Rebel T5i) Digital Camera
Canon EOS 100D (EOS Rebel SL1) Digital Camera
Canon EOS 6D Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS 650D / Rebel T4i Digital Camera
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Release Date
Jun 2013
Jun 2013
Mar 2013
Sep 2012
Jun 2012
Camera Type
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional, Compact SLR
SLR/Professional, Compact SLR
SLR/Professional
SLR/Professional
Image Sensor Size
27.04 mm
26.81 mm
26.81 mm
43.2 mm
26.7 mm
HD Recording Format
720p (HDTV), 1080p (HDTV), 480p, 1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 23.976 fps), 1280 x 720 (59.94, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (59.94
1080p (HDTV), 1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25 fps)
1080p (HDTV), 1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25 fps)
720p (HDTV), 1080p (HDTV), 480p
720p (HDTV), 1080p (HDTV)
Max. ISO Speed
25600.0
25600.0
25600.0
25600.0
25600.0
Resolution
20.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
20.2 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.

  • An overall excellent camera, but one that fails to capture the best-in-class prize for image quality.


  • The Canon EOS 70D delivers the smoothest Live View focus we've seen in a traditional D-SLR, but it can struggle to lock that focus in dim light.


  • Indeed, until we see Dual-Pixel CMOS AF inevitably make its way across the EOS range, we'd recommend the new Canon EOS 70D as the APS-C camera to go for if you're currently considering a mid-range DSLR camera. It offers a winning blend of features, performance and image quality that is hard to beat, both by its EOS brothers and other manufacturers' offerings. The new EOS 70D marks a real step forward for both Canon and the venerable SLR camera.


  • The official launch price of the Canon EOS 700D / Rebel T5i has dropped slightly compared to the previous model's full RRP, perhaps its most attractive feature when compared directly against its predecessor, especially as the STM kit lens is a better partner, especially for shooting video.


  • The Canon EOS 700D is a very capable and versatile camera that produces high quality images. It has a comprehensive feature set and affords all the control expected by enthusiast photographers while providing automatic hand-holding options for less experienced users.
    It produces images that are of very similar quality to those from the Canon 650D, although our tests reveal that they are a little noisier.


  • The Canon EOS 700D / Rebel T5i is an upgrade to the 650D almost in name only, but still combines very good image quality with a comprehensive, well-designed touchscreen interface. AF performance in live view mode and video is an improvement over early Rebel DSLRs, but still lags behind mirrorless options.


  • In summary the EOS 100D / Rebel SL1 is a surprising camera in many ways, not least that it delivers the typical EOS experience without too many compromises at all. It makes a compelling alternative to a compact system camera when paired with the smaller Canon lenses (including the EOS M), but we'd choose the more capable EOS 700D instead as a natural partner for Canon's larger optics.


  • Overall I'm going to give the EOS SL1 / 100D a Recommended rating. It misses out on our top award as I honestly think most people buying an entry-level DSLR would be better-served by a mirror-less camera these days. But for those who understand the differences and would genuinely prefer a traditional DSLR, the EOS SL1/ 100D represents a compelling option and a decent upgrade over the company's previous entry-level model, the EOS T3 / 1100D.


  • It's hard to know what to say about the Canon 100D. Canon has once again produced an incredibly capable DSLR, which produces excellent images.
    The miniaturisation element is fun, and a nifty feat of engineering, but there's still no way that a camera and system such as this can compete with the likes of the Micro Four Thirds system in terms of weight and size.


  • The Canon EOS 6D is a top-notch full-frame camera in a compact body. With a relatively affordable price, enthusiast-friendly features, and spectacular image quality, it's an easy Editors' Choice.


  • For those with prior lens family affiliation, your decision is already made. Almost all the praise we have for the Nikon D600 also applies to the 6D. We think the autofocus system does lag behind - only by a little - but enough to make this camera a slightly inferior choice for action photography. Otherwise, the Canon EOS 6D is tied for the best entry point for new full-frame photographers, and yes, represents a fantastic value, even at $2100.


  • Compared to the 5D Mark III's official price of £2999 / $3499, the 6D is something of a bargain at £1799 / $2099, especially as it delivers very similar image quality to its big brother. The only fly in the ointment in terms of price is the Nikon D600, which due to being released earlier now typically undercuts the 6D by a couple of hundred pounds / dollars. Still, the EOS 6D should also drop in price once the novelty has worn off.


  • In summary the new 650D / Rebel T4i is the most complicated yet friendly mid-range Canon DSLR yet, truly a camera that you can grow into as your photography skills develop. It only misses out on our highest Essential award because of the still slow Live View auto-focusing and a small price increase over the 600D, but is more than deserving of our still-coveted Highly Recommended award.


  • Although it has an 18 million pixel sensor, Canon's EOS 650D/Rebel T4i doesn't use the same CMOS device as other cameras in Canon's range. It uses a new Hybrid CMOS sensor that is designed to facilitate a combined phase detection and contrast detection autofocus system that operates during video recording and when Live View is activated.


  • With the EOS 650D, Canon faced the challenge of taking an already successful camera line and finding a way to offer more than a token upgrade without stealing too much thunder from its higher-spec'd DSLRs. By maintaining what has long been very good image quality for both stills and video shooting and addressing operational handling with a remarkably well-executed touchscreen implementation, the latest addition to the Rebel lineup carves out a niche as one of the more enjoyable to use entry level DSLRs on the market.