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Sub-$1000 is a great price point to look for the very best DSLR cameras. Almost all major brands have very good options at this price point and you should be spoilt for choice. Though before going to pick the best camera under 1000 dollar do factor in the cost of lenses as that is typically a substantial part of your budget.

The best digital cameras $1000 are the interchangeable lens cameras including DSLRs and compact system cameras. Provided with decent features, these prosumer cameras offer great image and video quality, speed and customizability options for photography enthusiasts. This is a great price segment for those who need to buy the entry-level DSLRs.

For the more-advanced photographers, the sub-$1000 digital cameras offer better low-light performance than that of advanced point and shoots. Considering the manual features they host, these cameras can also be very useful for capturing portraits and action shots.

Manufacturers like Canon, Sony and Panasonic offer the best digital cameras under $1000 for 2015 under the EOS, Alpha and Lumix product lines respectively.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras Under $1000 »

Canon EOS 760D

Canon EOS 760D


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Canon EOS 760D
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II
Canon EOS 750D
Nikon D5500
Canon EOS 760D
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II
Canon EOS 750D
Nikon D5500
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Release Date
Sep 2015
Sep 2015
Mar 2015
Jun 2015
Jan 2015
Camera Type
Compact SLR
Compact
SLR-style mirrorless
Compact SLR
Compact SLR
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
Image Sensor Size
26.81 mm
13.23 mm
21.64 mm
26.81 mm
28.2 mm

  • - HDMI output only functions when Wi-Fi/NFC is disabled.
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance settings too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - OVF coverage only 95%, with offset (this will likely change with sample variation).
    - Built-in flash can act as master to off-camera slave flash units.
    - Competitive though unexceptional burst speed for its class.
    - Excellent color and hue accuracy with manual white balance.
    - Very good high ISO performance for a 24-megapixel APS-C model.


  • This camera produces the same superb image quality as the 750D, but its better handling, helpful secondary LCD and electronic level makes it our choice of the two models. It's almost like a smaller, lighter 70D, with a better sensor.


  • - This camera is still pretty rugged, though, and will be able to handle some abuse.
    - Resolution is 1,040k-dot, offering good sharpness.
    - The viewfinder is good, but not class-leading.
    - Canon’s implementation of wireless tech is great too.


  • - Macro performance not quite as good as some competitors.
    - Battery life not as good as predecessor (but still fair for its size).
    - Slightly below average saturation levels and hue accuracy.
    - Still can't capture RAW files and JPEGs at the "Extra Fine" highest quality setting.
    - Default Wi-Fi camera app lacks robust functionality; need to install additional (free) app.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV offers serious video improvements over the RX100 III, but it is very expensive for a compact camera.


  • Sony has made some good improvements to what is already an excellently performing camera, but there are still a few small problems with the RX100 IV which make it just slightly less than perfect. Even if you can put the extremely high price aside (especially as that will drop as time goes on), it remains disappointing not to see a touch sensitive screen on a Sony RX100 - if for no other reason than setting the AF point would be much easier and quicker with one. It’s also frustrating that you have to switch off raw format shooting to make full use of some of the functions on offer here, too.


  • The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II has a unique high-resolution capture mode, but it's not the best camera for shooting fast-moving subjects.


  • It may look similar to the 3-year-old EM-5, but with a plethora of "under-the-hood" improvements, the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II far surpasses that camera, and in some ways the flagship OM-D E-M1 too.
    Although not quite as easy to use as the slightly larger Olympus OM-D E-M1, the E-M5 Mark II's revised control layout is well thought-out and the level of customisability is extremely high. The camera is robust – more so than the E-M5 –, and highly responsive. The EVF is among the best we have ever used, with great resolution, good colour rendition, fast refresh rates, a large apparent size and adaptive brightness control.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is a high-quality, compact ILC made to be easy enough for anyone to use. High-quality still images combined with the easy-to-use video features mean this is the only camera you will need. .


  • - HDMI output only functions when Wi-Fi/NFC is disabled.
    - OVF coverage only 94%, with offset (this will likely change with sample variation).
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance settings too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - The new sensor packs in a lot of resolution and results in very good image quality.
    - Very good high ISO performance for a 24-megapixel APS-C model.
    - OLPF means fewer aliasing artifacts, but images are a bit soft (could be a Pro or Con depending on perspective).


  • The Canon EOS 750D/Rebel T6i marks the tenth generation in a series that started way back in 2003 with the 300D/Rebel. However, each revision hasn’t always brought significant improvements. Whilst the 700D made waves with its touch-screen interface, its sensor dated back three generations to the 550D/Rebel T2i and was now outperformed in resolution and image quality.
    Thankfully the 750D addresses this and is arguably the most significant generational leap forward since the 550D.


  • This is a great camera that's capable of producing superb quality images which have much more detail than the 700D's. The control layout is also almost identical to the previous camera's, making the upgrade very smooth. The 760D, however, offers slightly better handling and would be our preferred choice.


  • The Nikon D5500 D-SLR delivers images that are just as good as the D5300 it replaces, and manages to do so in a smaller body.


  • Nikon's mid-range DSLR camera continues to evolve with the introduction of the D5500, which is smaller and significantly lighter than its predecessor whilst additionally offering a new touchscreen LCD/interface. It also sensibly ships with the retractable 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR II lens which helps to keep the overall package very compact for a DSLR. While it won't set your pulse racing, for the most part the Nikon D5500 is an .


  • The D5500 offers beginners a lot of creative control, the touch-screen display is a useful addition and the sensor captures high levels of detail. It's a pleasing camera, but it's no game-changer.