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The best cameras under $150 are mostly limited to the compact and ultra-compact cameras and combine mostly automatic controls with a good resolution and sensor size.

The higher-end models like DSLRs and interchangeable lens cameras are typically much higher priced and are not the best cameras to buy under 150. However, you can still get a good deal at this price provided you do not compromise on the basics.

Below $150 is the best price point to look for something basic, with mostly automatic controls - looks for an average megapixel but a good sensor - and most importantly stick to some of the well known brands like Canon, Sony and Kodak.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras Under $150 »

Canon EOS M3

Canon EOS M3


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Canon EOS M3
Lomo Instant
Canon IXUS 160
Nikon Coolpix S3700
Canon PowerShot ELPH 150 IS (IXUS 155)
Canon EOS M3
Lomo Instant
Canon IXUS 160
Nikon Coolpix S3700
Canon PowerShot ELPH 150 IS (IXUS 155)
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Release Date
Jun 2015
Dec 2014
Mar 2015
Mar 2015
Jul 2014
Camera Type
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Ultracompact
Ultracompact
Compact
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
14.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CCD
CCD
CCD
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
2.7 in.
2.7 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
26.81 mm
2.5 mm
2.5 mm
2.5 mm

  • The new Canon EOS M3 is a much more serious compact system camera than the original EOS M that we reviewed back in 2012. It offers a raft of improvements clearly aimed at making it more enthusiast-friendly, along with a big reduction in the launch price. Still, there are some rather big flies in the ointment which mean that the EOS M3 lags behind the mirrorless competition, most notably the lack of a built-in viewfinder and the continued lack of native EF-M lenses.


  • The Canon EOS M3 offers dSLR-quality photos and a nice design, but its feature set is average, performance is sluggish and its price relatively high, at least in the US and the UK.


  • - Handgrip is shallow.
    - Dials hard to move.
    - Useful live view and great screen.
    - You can take complete control of the exposure and with confidence capture what you are seeing on the screen.
    - Many elements come together to make for an enjoyable overall user experience.
    - For the most part, the control layout is good, though.


  • The Lomography Lomo'Instant is a fun instant camera with a wide-angle lens and support for multiple exposures.


  • If you’re a fan of analogue photography, in particular the Lomo brand, you should be fairly pleased with this camera.
    The Lomo Instant is a lot of fun, but on the flip side it’s quite an expensive purchase for something so frivolous. It’s reasonably easy to get the hang of using the camera, but experimentation is definitely required, at least at first.


  • Nobody is buying a camera like this because they want super sharp shots every time. Rather, it's designed as a bit of fun – and in good light you can get some nice results.


  • The Canon PowerShot Elph 160 is one of the least expensive compact cameras you can buy, but you're better off spending just a little bit more on a point-and-shoot.


  • Budget compact cameras rarely set the world alight with exceptional performance or innovative features, but the IXUS 160 is even more lacklustre than the norm. Aside from including a respectable amount of manual shooting options and a few nifty features, it’s an unremarkable camera.
    Image quality is average at best, with reasonable performance in good light, but disappointing indoor and low light results.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Canon ELPH 160 is an ultra-compact, affordable digicam. A 20-Megapixel imaging sensor and lack of OIS leave the camera capturing noisy images all the time. A perfect example of "you get what you pay for".


  • The Nikon Coolpix S3700 is a capable camera that performs well in most situations. Well exposed, vibrant images impress right from the off, and noise levels are fairly low up to ISO800. Vibration Reduction is an essential feature when shooting indoors or in low light, so it’s great the S3700 includes it.
    Still welcome, but arguably less important, is the in-built Wi-Fi. This works well, especially if you have an NFC-equipped smart device, and makes image sharing a breeze.


  • The Canon PowerShot Elph 150 IS packs a long zoom lens into a small body, but its images have way too much noise.


  • The Canon IXUS 155 has been designed to be appealing to look at and very easy to use. However, this sexiness with the point and shoot mentality isn't necessarily enough so the camera adds a few other bits and bobs to lure you up from the IXUS 150.
    It's a very easy camera to use and as such will suit most people in a family from young to old, technophobe to tech savvy. The compact design will slip easily into a pocket or bag which makes it great for days out or nights on the town.


  • The Canon Powershot SX150 IS has its share of niggles. But it is nevertheless a good buy. Definitely, not an upgrade over its predecessor but worth a look for first-time buyers. Casual users who wish to have a truckload of manual controls will enjoy the camera.