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The best digital cameras under $300 are the compacts and the ultra-compact. Due to falling prices and constant upgradation in technology the best sub-$300 cameras of today offer compelling image and video performance that rival the DSLR's of yesteryears.

Below dollar 300 is also a very good price point if you are looking for a casual use camera as you can often get the best brands with great performance at this price range. The best cameras below 300 for 2016 would ideally have the following:
1. Plenty of Resolution (Sensor size to match)
2. Large LCD
3. Great looks with possibly thin bodies

Browse All Top Digital Cameras Under $300 of 2016 »

Fuji XQ2

Fujifilm XQ2


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Fujifilm XQ2
Canon PowerShot SX610 HS
Canon PowerShot N2
Nikon Coolpix L840
Kodak PixPro SP360
Fujifilm XQ2
Canon PowerShot SX610 HS
Canon PowerShot N2
Nikon Coolpix L840
Kodak PixPro SP360
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Release Date
Mar 2015
Apr 2015
Apr 2015
May 2015
Nov 2014
Camera Type
Ultracompact
Compact
SLR-like (bridge)
Optical Zoom
4.0 x
18.0 x
38.0 x
Resolution
12.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
3.6 mm
2.5 mm
2.5 mm

  • The Fujifilm XQ2 is a pocket-friendly camera that is capable of capturing excellent images.


  • A thoroughly enjoyable camera to use. It does everything pretty well but falls short of challenging the very best in its class – a 1-inch sensor, better lens and a tilting touch-screen would potentially make the difference.


  • The Fujifilm QX2 doesn't improve much on its predecessor, but with its larger image sensor, bright lens and fast performance even in low light, this stylish pocket camera is an excellent step-up from your smartphone or average point-and-shoot.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX610 HS is an attractive compact camera with an 18x zoom lens, but image quality takes a step back from last year's edition.


  • The Canon PowerShot SX610 HS is a well-designed camera that’s easy to use thanks to its chunky, ergonomic build, and an intuitive menu design. You can also be sure it’ll snap accurately focussed and well exposed shots.
    Performance and image quality are also good, though not outstanding. The switch to a 20.2-megaixel sensor sounds great on paper, but in reality the camera can only resolve marginally more detail than the 16MP SX600 HS.


  • The SX610 HS' picture quality isn't a huge improvement over the SX600's—20 Mpx image sensor notwithstanding—but it would still make a great travel companion. It's pocket-sized, straightforward and versatile and has a great design and handling, not to mention a handy 18x zooom.


  • The Canon PowerShot N2 improves upon its predecessor, but this pocket camera is still held back by a design that makes it downright awkward to use.


  • Given the original N was clearly a niche product and its style hasn’t been widely replicated, it’s perhaps surprising that Canon has followed it up with the N2. Clearly this is a camera aimed at fashion-conscious smartphone photographers who want better image quality and also the versatility of optical zoom, but the Canon PowerShot N2 doesn’t really hit this mark.
    Where smartphones get progressively slimmer to make them more pocketable and feature ever-expanding screens, the chubby N2 is noticeably harder to pocket than a regular compact camera.


  • The Powershot N2 is just as seductive as its predecessor thanks to an original design and improved yet still unconventional handling. Little by little, and with the help of some new additions, like a 180° touchscreen, 16 Mpx sensor and brand new processor, this little camera is evolving into a well-rounded and fun little compact. Wherever you take it—and you will take it everywhere!—the N2 will draw attention.


  • The Nikon Coolpix L840 is a decent all-rounder that performs well and generates reasonable image quality, providing you don’t scrutinise too closely and spot the slightly disappointing detail levels. It’s fast to focus, exposes accurately and has a simple control layout that just as easy to learn and operate as a basic compact camera.


  • Fashioning this boxy plastic 10 megapixel, Full HD video action camera in a spot-on, brand-aware blend of Kodak yellow and black is a clever, ‘on message’ touch that makes the most of that famous name. Handling wise, and given the 360 degree angle of view here there are inevitably do’s and don’ts when it comes to getting the best from the Kodak Pixpro SP360 however.


  • Overall, the SP360 is easy to use and the quickest way to record 360-degree content without having to set up complicated rigs, but like the V.360 it suffers from image quality issues. The SP360 is all about capturing the experience of the moment, and for activities or travel, it’s a nice secondary camera to bring along. Up your game and the get the most out of your gear with the following extras, hand-picked by our editors:. Kodak Pixpro Self Shooting Pole ($30). Selfie sticks may be frowned upon, but to capture a good 360 panorama, it’s more effective to hold the SP360 above you.


  • We absolutely fell in love with the Kodak Pixpro SP360 and would rank it among the top three innovations of this year. It has everything we look for in a device: innovation (it films in 360 degrees!), it's a cinch to use, it has enormous potential and it's well priced. If you're the adventurous type who likes filming your exploits in natural or urban settings, and you're into cool technology, why you get it?.