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The best digital SLR cameras for professional use are the midrange DSLRs (Digital single-lens reflex camera) which are suited best for portrait, wildlife and action photography. Olympus offers you these kind of cameras under $1000 with 14 Megapixel cameras and best touch screen interface.

Check out the list of best DSLRs under $1000 top rated by some of the best cellphone reviewers.

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Canon EOS 70D

Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera


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Canon EOS 70D
Nikon D7100
Nikon D5200
Sony SLT-A37
Canon EOS 650D (Rebel T4i)
Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera
Nikon D7100 Digital Camera
Nikon D5200 Digital Camera with 18-105mm lens
Sony SLT-A37M 3D Digital Camera with 18-135mm lens
Canon EOS Rebel T4i Digital Camera with 18-135mm lens
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Release Date
Jun 2013
Feb 2013
Dec 2012
Jun 2012
Jun 2012
Camera Type
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional
SLR/Professional, 3D Digital Camera
SLR/Professional
Resolution
20.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
24.7 Megapixel
16.1 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
2.7 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
27.04 mm
28.2 mm
28.2 mm
28.2 mm
26.7 mm

  • An overall excellent camera, but one that fails to capture the best-in-class prize for image quality.


  • The Canon EOS 70D delivers the smoothest Live View focus we've seen in a traditional D-SLR, but it can struggle to lock that focus in dim light.


  • Indeed, until we see Dual-Pixel CMOS AF inevitably make its way across the EOS range, we'd recommend the new Canon EOS 70D as the APS-C camera to go for if you're currently considering a mid-range DSLR camera. It offers a winning blend of features, performance and image quality that is hard to beat, both by its EOS brothers and other manufacturers' offerings. The new EOS 70D marks a real step forward for both Canon and the venerable SLR camera.


  • While it's still a great prosumer dSLR, the D7100 may only be worth the extra cash if you need a faster Nikon right now.


  • If you're in the market for a serious D-SLR, but don't want to go full-frame, the Nikon D7100 is the way to go; it's our Editors' Choice camera in its category.


  • Aside from white balance, the D7100 leaves us with little to complain about. Videography is definitely improved over previous models, but there are some strange control quirks, and plenty of better video-oriented SLRs already exist on the market. Nikon could also do a much better job communicating its "unique" control techniques to new users.


  • The Nikon D5200 makes a great choice for family and vacation photographers.


  • The under-$1,000 Nikon D5200 is a capable D-SLR that delivers impressive image quality and continuous shooting at 4 frames per second, earning it our Editors' Choice.


  • The ultimate irony of these cameras is this: when the D5100 first came to market we awarded it both Camera of the Year, and Budget DSLR of the Year. It was just such an amazing deal, with rare levels of performance at the price point. But after two years and little improvement for the D5200, this great camera didn't hit us with the same impact its predecessor did. Like we've said countless times in the review, the D5200 is a fine camera, but it's not $300 finer than the old one.


  • A good option if you're looking for something fast with a viewfinder and tilting LCD, the Sony Alpha SLT-A37 is a solid but not outstanding sub-$800 dSLR-style camera.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Sony Alpha A37 is a fairly standard upgrade for the company's entry-level SLT DSLR lineup. It replaces the A35 with some basic upgrades to control, a new image sensor, but a largely unchanged design. The A37 is aimed largely at beginners, with most of its features designed for those adapting to DSLRs from point and shoots. The highlight feature is the auto portrait framing mode, which will automatically crop your portraits shots to better highlight your subject according to standard rules of photographic composition.


  • The Sony A37 is a compelling entry-level DSLR camera with features, still and video image quality, and overall performance that beat its main rivals. Only the small, low-resolution, non-articulating LCD screen detracts from an otherwise outstanding camera that will more than satisfy the needs of its target audience. The A37 marries most of the core features of its bigger brother, the A57, with the more diminutive body of its predessor, the A33, resulting in the cheapest SLT camera to date.


  • In summary the new 650D / Rebel T4i is the most complicated yet friendly mid-range Canon DSLR yet, truly a camera that you can grow into as your photography skills develop. It only misses out on our highest Essential award because of the still slow Live View auto-focusing and a small price increase over the 600D, but is more than deserving of our still-coveted Highly Recommended award.


  • Although it has an 18 million pixel sensor, Canon's EOS 650D/Rebel T4i doesn't use the same CMOS device as other cameras in Canon's range. It uses a new Hybrid CMOS sensor that is designed to facilitate a combined phase detection and contrast detection autofocus system that operates during video recording and when Live View is activated.


  • With the EOS 650D, Canon faced the challenge of taking an already successful camera line and finding a way to offer more than a token upgrade without stealing too much thunder from its higher-spec'd DSLRs. By maintaining what has long been very good image quality for both stills and video shooting and addressing operational handling with a remarkably well-executed touchscreen implementation, the latest addition to the Rebel lineup carves out a niche as one of the more enjoyable to use entry level DSLRs on the market.