By .

PDF documents are supported on most of the ebook readers but all devices are not equally good. The top ebook readers for PDF files have 6 inch to 7 inch screens which display crisp texts and are viewable in dark surroundings as well as bright daylight. Presence of touch screens in e-readers are more advantageous for ease of operation.

The best ebook readers for PDF files allow easy horizontal scrolling, options for zooming in, out and rotating the documents to best fit the screen size. These ebook readers have lots of functionalities such as provision for note taking, highlighting texts, searching, navigating table of contents, dictionary and wikipedia lookup. The top ranked PDF e-readers come with 2GB to 4GB internal memory and provision for online storage to further enhance the reading experience.

Here we have listed the best ebook reader for PDF files which have been chosen by considering the topmost reviews of ereading devices.

Browse All Top eBook Reader for PDF files »

Amazon Kindle

Amazon Kindle 2012 E Ink Display 6" (2GB) eBook Reader


#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Amazon Kindle 2012
Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 3G
Barnes & Noble Nook Simple Touch
Sony PRS-T2HBC
Amazon Kindle Touch
Amazon Kindle 2012 E Ink Display 6" (2GB) eBook Reader
Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 6in 3G eBook Reader
Barnes & Noble Nook Simple Touch eBook Reader
Sony PRS-T2HBC eBook Reader
Amazon Kindle Touch eBook Reader
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
Release Date
Sep 2012
Sep 2012
Apr 2012
Aug 2012
Nov 2011
Text Formats
DOC, HTML, PDF, PRC, TXT, AZW, MOBI
AZW, HTML, PRC (Mobipocket), PDF, DOC, TXT, DOCX
ePub, PDF
ePub, PDF, TXT
AZW, DOC, PRC (Mobipocket), PDF, TXT, HTML, DOCX
Family Line
Amazon Kindle
Amazon Kindle
Sony PRS
Amazon Kindle
Installed RAM
2048.0 MB
2048.0 MB
2048.0 MB
2048.0 MB
4096.0 MB
Screen Size
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
Type
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
Weight
5.98 oz.
7.8 oz.
7.5 oz.
5.9 oz.
7.5 oz.

  • The $69 Amazon Kindle is an excellent no-frills e-book reader for anyone who's willing to forgo a built-in light or a touch screen.


  • The $69 base version of the Amazon Kindle is even better than before, thanks to a price drop and a slightly improved display.


  • The Kindle 4's small flaws prove to be less important than the much more obvious reduction in size. Amazon's offering was always cheaper than its nearest rival, Sony's Reader, but bigger. Now it's effectively the same size.

    Ignore red herrings such as storage capacity and storage expansion - the Kindle 3 has sufficient space and the Cloud behind it for the rest - and you're really just left with brand and format personal preference, and pricing.


  • In the end, I didn't find a whole lot to complain about. Yeah, it would be nice if the Paperwhite were a little bit lighter. As I said in the intro, it weighs 7.5 ounces. However, if, for instance, you add Amazon's nice Leather Cover -- it better be nice for $40! -- which has a magnetic on/off feature, you end up at around 13 ounces. For some, that will seem a tad weighty, so shaving off a couple ounces should be a priority for Amazon when it makes the next-generation Paperwhite. Easier said than done, of course.


  • The Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 3G offers always-on connectivity, bright, even edge-lighting, and numerous other improvements, but it's simply too expensive.


  • The Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is a great ebook reader, with a built-in light that makes for clear, comfortable reading, even in the dark. Buying books direct from Amazon is a breeze, though there's still no support for the popular .epub file format.


  • The new touch-screen Nook is a major advancement over its predecessor and offers some real advantages over the 2010 Kindle.


  • An E Ink reader you can use in the dark? Yep. Barnes & Noble delivers the first ebook reader with edge lighting that really works. And it's a winner.


  • Barnes & Noble's Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight is a darn fine e-book reader. But for the fact that the Kobo Glo delivers the same features for £10 less, I'd recommend the Nook unequivocally. The B&N offering is certainly better - and better value - than the Kindle Touch, but that's of little concern to anyone already tied into the Amazon ecosystem.


  • Add everything up and it's clear the Kindle Touch offers the most features in an e-ink e-reader, with lots of audio options, the X-Ray feature, and Amazon Prime free loaners leading the list. For many people, the audio extras won't seem important, but for some, they'll be a key differentiator.
    On the downside, the dearth of physical page-turn buttons may be a real issue for some, especially lefties. And the Touch is a tad heavier than the superslim entry-level Kindle. But there's very little not to like here.


  • Initially, I had misgivings about Amazon's Kindle e-readers due to format constraints, but having used the workarounds available to good effect, this no longer remains a concern. The Kindle Touch is just the right size and its touchscreen makes for an uncluttered viewing experience. That said, navigating the user interface felt cumbersome at times and the list viewing of stored titles seems somewhat inelegant.


  • Multi-touch makes e-reading easier than ever but a sluggish interface means the Amazon Kindle Touch isn't cut out for speed reading.


Top 5 ebook reader for pdf files:

  1. Amazon Kindle 2012 E Ink Display 6" (2GB) eBook Reader
  2. Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 6in 3G eBook Reader
  3. Barnes & Noble Nook Simple Touch eBook Reader
  4. Sony PRS-T2HBC eBook Reader
  5. Amazon Kindle Touch eBook Reader