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Among the many recent technological innovations, ebook readers assume a prominent place, providing readers with easy access to a range of books and other online materials. The markets are constantly flooded with e-book readers from a large number of manufacturers and new models are being released on a frequent basis. Like anything else in the field of electronic products, there are a good number of factors that need to be considered when choosing an e-book reader.

Is it the best ebook reader for you?
A good e-book reader must be able to display the content clearly and in any environment, it must not strain the eyes. It should be easy to carry around and most important of all, have a long battery life. Then comes the secondary preferences such as added functionality, design features, display type among many others. A majority of the ebook readers today use the E Ink display that are available in paperback sizes.

The content
The most important feature you must look at when buying an e-book reader is the number of books or amount of content you can gain access to from your device. The e-book reader manufacturers generally have their own custom stores to buy e-books from. The greater the number of books available in the stores the better. Some other manufacturers allow access to content from other vendors. While this would ensure a greater access to content, a small compromise is often required when it comes to the user experience. These devices may throw up integration issues.

eBook reader formats
The next important aspect you need to consider is the number of formats your e-book is compatible with. A majority of the e-book readers today support txt, JPG, HTML and MP3. There are also a few other proprietary formats such as .azw and open source formats such as ePub. It is always preferable to buy e-books that are compatible with the ePub format as all the major publishing houses use ePub to release their e-books.

Functionality
Another important aspect you need to decide upon before finalizing your ebook reader is the functionality. You need to determine the exact purposes of how you would use the e-book readers. If all you want is to read books, then you have a very wide variety of choices. However, if you are also interested in reading magazines, blogs and newspapers on your e-book readers, your choices are somewhat restricted.

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Amazon Kindle

Amazon Kindle 2012 E Ink Display 6" (2GB) eBook Reader


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Amazon Kindle 2012
Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 3G
Barnes & Noble Nook Simple Touch
Sony PRS-T2HBC
Amazon Kindle Touch
Amazon Kindle 2012 E Ink Display 6" (2GB) eBook Reader
Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 6in 3G eBook Reader
Barnes & Noble Nook Simple Touch eBook Reader
Sony PRS-T2HBC eBook Reader
Amazon Kindle Touch eBook Reader
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Release Date
Sep 2012
Sep 2012
Apr 2012
Aug 2012
Nov 2011
Family Line
Amazon Kindle
Amazon Kindle
Sony PRS
Amazon Kindle
Installed RAM
2048.0 MB
2048.0 MB
2048.0 MB
2048.0 MB
4096.0 MB
Screen Size
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
6.0 inch
Type
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
eBook Reader
Weight
5.98 oz.
7.8 oz.
7.5 oz.
5.9 oz.
7.5 oz.
Text Formats
DOC, HTML, PDF, PRC, TXT, AZW, MOBI
AZW, HTML, PRC (Mobipocket), PDF, DOC, TXT, DOCX
ePub, PDF
ePub, PDF, TXT
AZW, DOC, PRC (Mobipocket), PDF, TXT, HTML, DOCX

  • The $69 Amazon Kindle is an excellent no-frills e-book reader for anyone who's willing to forgo a built-in light or a touch screen.


  • The $69 base version of the Amazon Kindle is even better than before, thanks to a price drop and a slightly improved display.


  • The Kindle 4's small flaws prove to be less important than the much more obvious reduction in size. Amazon's offering was always cheaper than its nearest rival, Sony's Reader, but bigger. Now it's effectively the same size.

    Ignore red herrings such as storage capacity and storage expansion - the Kindle 3 has sufficient space and the Cloud behind it for the rest - and you're really just left with brand and format personal preference, and pricing.


  • In the end, I didn't find a whole lot to complain about. Yeah, it would be nice if the Paperwhite were a little bit lighter. As I said in the intro, it weighs 7.5 ounces. However, if, for instance, you add Amazon's nice Leather Cover -- it better be nice for $40! -- which has a magnetic on/off feature, you end up at around 13 ounces. For some, that will seem a tad weighty, so shaving off a couple ounces should be a priority for Amazon when it makes the next-generation Paperwhite. Easier said than done, of course.


  • The Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 3G offers always-on connectivity, bright, even edge-lighting, and numerous other improvements, but it's simply too expensive.


  • The Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is a great ebook reader, with a built-in light that makes for clear, comfortable reading, even in the dark. Buying books direct from Amazon is a breeze, though there's still no support for the popular .epub file format.


  • The new touch-screen Nook is a major advancement over its predecessor and offers some real advantages over the 2010 Kindle.


  • An E Ink reader you can use in the dark? Yep. Barnes & Noble delivers the first ebook reader with edge lighting that really works. And it's a winner.


  • Barnes & Noble's Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight is a darn fine e-book reader. But for the fact that the Kobo Glo delivers the same features for £10 less, I'd recommend the Nook unequivocally. The B&N offering is certainly better - and better value - than the Kindle Touch, but that's of little concern to anyone already tied into the Amazon ecosystem.


  • Add everything up and it's clear the Kindle Touch offers the most features in an e-ink e-reader, with lots of audio options, the X-Ray feature, and Amazon Prime free loaners leading the list. For many people, the audio extras won't seem important, but for some, they'll be a key differentiator.
    On the downside, the dearth of physical page-turn buttons may be a real issue for some, especially lefties. And the Touch is a tad heavier than the superslim entry-level Kindle. But there's very little not to like here.


  • Initially, I had misgivings about Amazon's Kindle e-readers due to format constraints, but having used the workarounds available to good effect, this no longer remains a concern. The Kindle Touch is just the right size and its touchscreen makes for an uncluttered viewing experience. That said, navigating the user interface felt cumbersome at times and the list viewing of stored titles seems somewhat inelegant.


  • Multi-touch makes e-reading easier than ever but a sluggish interface means the Amazon Kindle Touch isn't cut out for speed reading.