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The best Nikon cameras for interiors are the professional digital cameras with the options for lens interchangeability. These cameras are generally released under D series from the manufacturer and can be best suited for capturing portraits and party photos. With the ability to capture images of at least 18 Megapixel, these cameras come with the best interfaces and optics and can be affordable at a price range of at least $1000.

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Nikon D7200

Nikon D7200


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Nikon D7200
Nikon 1 J5
Nikon D750
Nikon Coolpix P900
Nikon D810
Nikon D7200
Nikon 1 J5
Nikon D750
Nikon Coolpix P900
Nikon D810
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Release Date
Apr 2015
May 2015
Sep 2014
Apr 2015
Jul 2014
Max. ISO Speed
25600.0
12800.0
12800.0
6400.0
12800.0
Camera Type
Mid-size SLR
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Mid-size SLR
SLR-like (bridge)
Mid-size SLR
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
21.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
36.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
Image Sensor Size
28.2 mm
13.23 mm
43.18 mm
2.5 mm
43.18 mm

  • - Sensitivities greater than ISO 25,600-equivalent are only available in black-and-white mode.
    - Full-time autofocus is slow to respond, and prone to hunting or seeking in the wrong direction.
    - Metering and function buttons are tough to reach if your hands aren't large.
    - Built-in Wi-Fi functionality is rough around the edges, and has a limited feature-set.


  • The D7200 is the most serious D-SLR in Nikon's DX lineup, but it doesn't equal our Editors' Choice Canon 7D Mark II for capturing action.


  • Rather than completely changing the design and way the D7200 works, Nikon has made a few incremental upgrades which tweaks the camera to make it even more appealing than its predecessor (which was also pretty great). It’s designed for enthusiasts, which means that it needs to be good at a wide variety of different subject matters - and happily, the D7200 is.
    Whether you feel you want to upgrade from the D7100 is questionable and it may come down to the type of subjects you like to shoot.


  • If you're not a serious shutterbug, you'll appreciate the ease of using the fast-shooting Nikon 1 J5 mirrorless camera.


  • While the ability to capture 4K video footage may make all the headlines, the Nikon 1 J5's change in focus to a more prosumer, enthusiast camera is actually the bigger story. The addition of front and rear handgrips, PASM modes on the shooting mode dial, a command dial and Function button all point to a change in direction for the J5, despite it still being a very affordable compact system camera.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Nikon 1 J5 is a nice mirrorless ILC that makes quite a few improvements from the Nikon 1 J4. However, it still has enough minor annoyances that add up quickly to make it lag just behind some similar mirrorless models. Nikon gave the J5 a sharp touchscreen that can tilt up to 180 degrees, as well as a mode dial with plenty of automatic shooting modes that will give inexperienced photographers an easy transition to this ILC. Nikon didn't forget more experienced photographers, who can use the full manual control features.


  • The Nikon D750 delivers pro-level performance at a reasonable asking price, making it our Editor's Choice for full-frame DSLRs under $2,500.


  • Combining the design and handling of the cheaper D610 with many of the more expensive D810's features, Nikon have clearly positioned the new full-frame D750 between the two. Do you like the compactness, handling and smaller 24-megapixel files of the D610 but want the better features (especially on the video side) of the D810? Then the D750 is an obvious choice, especially when you consider that it also offers built-in wi-fi, a tilting LCD screen, 6.5fps continuous shooting, even lower-light auto-focusing and longer battery life.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Nikon D750 is an outstanding Full-Frame dSLR. A great mix of performance and image quality, you will get the best of both worlds. Along with the outstanding performance, Nikon has also included some great convenience features like a tilting LCD and Built-in WiFi connectivity. .


  • The Nikon Coolpix P900 boasts the longest zoom range of any camera on the market, but a lack of detail at higher ISOs holds it back.


  • Using zoom ratios seems to be the new way to sell cameras where once it was all about the megapixels. Here on the Nikon Coolpix P900 we have an 83x optical zoom, which is currently the market leader. However, to get to that kind of ratio, you need to have a huge camera and that won’t be to everybody’s tastes.


  • The P900 is the longest-zoom bridge camera in the world – for now, at least – but it's also big, heavy and expensive. Image quality at shorter focal lengths is good but falls away at high zooms settings.


  • - Places strong demands on your lens and ability to keep the camera steady or use a high-enough shutter speed, if you really want to extract the maximum detail.
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - Default saturation, contrast and sharpening a little high for a pro model (though some will prefer the change in JPEG rendering).
    - Wi-Fi connectivity relies on an expensive, external accessory that negates the D810's weather-sealing.


  • The Nikon D810 is a high-resolution monster with incredible image quality and performance. It's expensive, but earns Editors' Choice honors.


  • The Nikon D810 is an incremental upgrade of a great camera, adding slightly better image quality and a smattering of new features to the best-selling D800/E, most notably the improved shutter mechanism and electronic shutter option which help to combat unwanted vibrations, and the beefed-up video mode. While the D810 remains an enticing proposition, it faces fierce competition not only from Canon with the venerable EOS 5D Mark III, but Sony with the smaller, lighter and just as capable A7R.