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Usually, Leica digital cameras are marked a premium price range and especially for easier buying choice, we have sorted out the listing of best price Leica cameras in the ascending order of their prices. Most of the below listed top-rated cameras are the standard point and shoot cameras which can capture images of at least 14 Megapixel resolution. As mentioned before, these cameras can be availed at a price of at least $700.

Browse All Top Price Leica Camera »

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Leica D-Lux (Typ 109)
Leica V-Lux (Typ 114)
Leica X-E (Typ 102)
Leica T
Leica X (Typ 113)
Leica D-Lux (Typ 109)
Leica V-Lux (Typ 114)
Leica X-E (Typ 102)
Leica T (Typ 701)
Leica X (Typ 113)
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Release Date
Nov 2014
Oct 2014
Jan 2015
Jul 2014
Feb 2015
Camera Type
Large sensor compact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Large sensor compact
Optical Zoom
3.1 x
1.0 x
Resolution
13.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.7 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
21.64 mm
28.34 mm
27.73 mm

  • With very few differences between the Leica D-Lux (Typ 109) and the virtually identical
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100
    that we so enthusiastically reviewed back in October 2014, the choice between these two excellent cameras essentially comes down to four things - the overall cost, the inclusion of Lightroom and a longer warranty with the Leica, the handgrip on the Panasonic, and of course that famous Leica red dot. For us, the lack of any sort of handgrip on the Leica D-Lux (Typ 109) makes it harder, although certainly not impossible, to get a firm grip on the camera.


  • The D-Lux is a delight to use and it produces high quality images, but the Panasonic LX100, which has the same spec, feels safer in your hand thanks to the front grip that's missing from the Leica camera.


  • The Leica V-Lux (Typ 114) is the same camera as the Panasonic FZ1000, but it adds a longer warranty and an Adobe Lightroom license.


  • Recently the bridge camera sector has become a key battleground for manufacturers trying to carve a niche distinct from smartphones. Now that the latter can boast comparable image quality and pixel counts, cramming upwards of 60x optical zoom into a camera has been a marketing miracle. But, like the ever-increasing megapixel counts in compact cameras a few years ago, more doesn’t always mean better. Leica/Panasonic should be applauded for producing a camera that bucks this trend in favour of image quality.


  • Like its almost identical twin (the Panasonic FZ1000), the V-Lux Typ 114 has a very desirable lens and a good quality 1-inch sensor that produces high quality images in raw and JPEG format.


  • The Leica X-E (Typ 102) is a repackaged version of an older camera, and some of its components are showing their age.


  • The new Leica X-E (Typ 102) is essentially a cost-reduced version of the three year old X2 camera, offering exactly the same features and image quality at a slightly lower recommended official price. It's starting to look dated now in 2015, with the lack of a movie mode and , so much so that we can't really recommend it despite the price reduction.


  • The Leica T (Typ 701) features a stunning aluminum unibody design, but it's not as robust as its price tag implies.


  • The Leica T is a beautifully designed, incredibly well-made interchangeable lens camera that's clearly targeted at a younger generation than the company's typical customer - think the son/daughter of a Leica M user, for example. With its Apple-like unibody design, cameraphone-like touchscreen interface and huge range of accessories, the Leica T is the ultimate step-up camera for the affluent consumer.


  • It's good to see Leica embracing new technologies and new ways of controling a camera to give it greater appeal for the next generation of well-heeled photographers.


  • The Leica X (Typ 113) prime compact camera has the brightest lens you'll find in its class, but it's expensive and has its share of quirks.


  • As with the X-E model that we recently reviewed, the new Leica X (Typ 113) takes the two year old X2 camera as its starting point, but unlike the X-E, Leica have seen fit to upgrade a number of key areas, principally the lens, LCD screen and video mode, resulting in the true successor the X2.
    The new faster lens is a very welcome addition, making it easier to capture sharp images in low-light, capturing better bokeh effects, and offering a closer focusing distance of 20cms.


  • The Leica X (Typ 113) is an across-the-board improvement. It has a 35mm f/1.7 lens (the brightest of its kind), much faster performance, Full HD video and, finally, a modern 2014-style display. Even the manufacturing and handling have gotten better. However, the Leica logo itself doesn't justify the design issues or the fact that the tech is still behind the competition. All the same, it's a good pick for Leica fans who wish they had a mini-M, or any non-Leica fans in search of charm and simplicity.


Top 5 price leica camera:

  1. Leica D-Lux (Typ 109)
  2. Leica V-Lux (Typ 114)
  3. Leica X-E (Typ 102)
  4. Leica T (Typ 701)
  5. Leica X (Typ 113)