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Professionals use DSLRs in low light for wildlife photography. Most of these cameras are from Nikon and Canon with atleast 18 and 14 Megapixel, and also suitable for capturing action shots. These cameras have a minimum ISO speed of 1000.

Browse All Top Professional DSLR Digital Cameras For Low Light »

Nikon D610

Nikon D610 24.3 MP CMOS FX-Format Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)


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Nikon D610
Nikon D600
Canon EOS 6D
Canon EOS-1D X
Nikon D800
Nikon D610 24.3 MP CMOS FX-Format Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Nikon D600 DSLR Digital Camera
Canon EOS 6D Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS-1D X Body Only Digital Camera
Nikon D800 Body Only Light Field Camera
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Release Date
Oct 2013
Sep 2012
Sep 2012
Jun 2012
Apr 2012
Camera Type
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional
SLR/Professional
SLR/Professional
SLR/Professional
Image Sensor Size
43.18 mm
43.2 mm
43.2 mm
43.2 mm
43.2 mm
Max. ISO Speed
25600.0
25600.0
25600.0
204800.0
25600.0
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
24.3 Megapixel
20.2 Megapixel
18.1 Megapixel
36.3 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.2 in.
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
3.2 in.

  • Though competition's increasing for low-end full-frame cameras, the Nikon D610 holds its own; that said, while slightly faster than its predecessor it's not a whole lot different.


  • That the D610 is lighter than any other Nikon FX digital SLR camera is a real boon to anyone planning to use it for extended periods of time, though be prepared that it's still quite a handful and noticeably heavier than the cheapest auto focus SLRs of the film era (then again, it's a much higher specified model than any of those). The Nikon D610's mirror is surprisingly quiet for a full-frame SLR camera and in normal use it produces only minimal viewfinder blackout.


  • While the Nikon D610 is an excellent camera that's capable of recording plenty of detail in images with rich tones, good exposure and pleasant colours it is considerably more expensive the Canon 6D.


  • The Nikon D600 is essentially a D7000 with an FX sensor, but lacks some of the extra features found in the Canon EOS 6D.


  • The Nikon D600 was one of the worst-kept secrets in the industry this year, and the enthusiast and prosumer crowd has been foaming at the mouth to see what an affordable full-frame camera from Nikon would look like. The Nikon D600 does not disappoint, offering nearly every bit of control that the impressive D800 offers, with comparable features.

    The D600 is an odd camera to write first impressions about, because it's clearly ready for public consumption, having already hit the labs of the folks at DXOMark.


  • If you think you can live with that and a few other limitations / omissions versus the D800; the smaller, lighter and cheaper Nikon D600 will serve you just as well as the more expensive model - and even give you faster frame rates and more manageable raw file sizes as an added bonus.


  • The Canon EOS 6D is a top-notch full-frame camera in a compact body. With a relatively affordable price, enthusiast-friendly features, and spectacular image quality, it's an easy Editors' Choice.


  • For those with prior lens family affiliation, your decision is already made. Almost all the praise we have for the Nikon D600 also applies to the 6D. We think the autofocus system does lag behind - only by a little - but enough to make this camera a slightly inferior choice for action photography. Otherwise, the Canon EOS 6D is tied for the best entry point for new full-frame photographers, and yes, represents a fantastic value, even at $2100.


  • Compared to the 5D Mark III's official price of £2999 / $3499, the 6D is something of a bargain at £1799 / $2099, especially as it delivers very similar image quality to its big brother. The only fly in the ointment in terms of price is the Nikon D600, which due to being released earlier now typically undercuts the 6D by a couple of hundred pounds / dollars. Still, the EOS 6D should also drop in price once the novelty has worn off.


  • When we first saw the Canon 1D X way back in the fall of 2011, it became immediately clear that Canon was looking to produce a camera that would be right at home in the bags of world-class photographers and videographers alike.

    Even amongst pure still photographers, the Canon 1D X's dove-tailing of the sports-centric 1D Mark IV and the studio-centric 1Ds Mark III lines seemed to be an ambitious move designed to capture the majority of the pro market with a single professional body.


  • At around £5,300 for the body-only the Canon EOS-1D X doesn't come cheap, but if you're a professional photographer who makes a living from photography then the 1D X is one of the best tools that money can buy. Put simply the Canon EOS-1D X is remarkable camera and we have no hesitation in saying it's the best Canon DSLR we've ever used.


  • Fast, tough, long-lasting and able to produce exceptional images. Some other full-frame models outperform in the resolution stakes, and Canon's lost its formerly enviable "movie king" hat, but otherwise the 1D X is as good as professional full-frame DSLR cameras get.


  • An unsurprisingly great camera that's worth every penny of its higher price for its target market of professional nonsports photographers, the Nikon D800 should definitely please those who've been waiting patiently to replace their older Nikon equipment.


  • The full-frame Nikon D800 manages to deliver 36 megapixels of resolution, without sacrificing image quality at high ISOs. It only shoots 4 frames per second, but that should be sufficient for event photographers, landscape shooters, and well-heeled enthusiasts.


  • The Nikon D800 is a beast of a camera, an extraordinarily high-resolution anachronism dropped into a supposedly post-megapixel world. The 36.3-megapixel sensor of the D800 defines it; it is the camera's greatest asset, making it one of the most flexible, enjoyable cameras we've ever shot with.

    If you follow the rumor mill, the D800 was supposed to be a successor to the D700, a camera that would excel in low light, offer exceptional speed, focus quickly, and still be light and compact by the standards of bulky full-frame bodies.


Top 5 professional dslr digital camera for low light:

  1. Nikon D610 24.3 MP CMOS FX-Format Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
  2. Nikon D600 DSLR Digital Camera
  3. Canon EOS 6D Digital SLR Camera
  4. Canon EOS-1D X Body Only Digital Camera
  5. Nikon D800 Body Only Light Field Camera