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The best Sony cameras for wildlife photography are the professional and mid-range DSLRs under the Alpha product line. Some of these cameras are also the compact system cameras which support continuous autofocus focus mode. Supporting the Wi-Fi connectivity feature, some of the below listed top-rated cameras also make use of remote control system and all of them are available at a price of at least $800.

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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV


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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Sony A7 II
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II
Sony A5100
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Sony A7 II
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II
Sony A5100
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Release Date
Sep 2015
Mar 2015
Aug 2015
Sep 2015
Sep 2014
Focus Type
Contrast Detect (sensor), Multi-area, Center, Selective single-point, Tracking, Single, Continuous AF, Face Detection, Live View, Manual focus
Contrast Detect (sensor), Phase Detect, Multi-area, Center, Selective single-point, Single, Continuous AF, Face Detection, Live View, Manual focus
Contrast Detect (sensor), Multi-area, Center, Selective single-point, Tracking, Single, Continuous AF, Face Detection, Live View
Contrast Detect (sensor), Multi-area, Center, Selective single-point, Tracking, Single, Continuous AF, Face Detection, Live View, Manual focus
Contrast Detect (sensor), Phase Detect, Multi-area, Center, Selective single-point, Tracking, Single, Continuous AF, Touch, Face Detection, Live View, Manual focus
Frames Per Second
16.0 Frames
5.0 Frames
10.0 Frames
14.0 Frames
6.0 Frames
Camera Type
Compact
SLR-style mirrorless
Compact
SLR-like (bridge)
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Optical Zoom
2.9 x
30.0 x
8.3 x
Resolution
20.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
13.23 mm
43.04 mm
2.5 mm
13.23 mm
28.2 mm

  • - Macro performance not quite as good as some competitors.
    - Battery life not as good as predecessor (but still fair for its size).
    - Slightly below average saturation levels and hue accuracy.
    - Still can't capture RAW files and JPEGs at the "Extra Fine" highest quality setting.
    - Default Wi-Fi camera app lacks robust functionality; need to install additional (free) app.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV offers serious video improvements over the RX100 III, but it is very expensive for a compact camera.


  • Sony has made some good improvements to what is already an excellently performing camera, but there are still a few small problems with the RX100 IV which make it just slightly less than perfect. Even if you can put the extremely high price aside (especially as that will drop as time goes on), it remains disappointing not to see a touch sensitive screen on a Sony RX100 - if for no other reason than setting the AF point would be much easier and quicker with one. It’s also frustrating that you have to switch off raw format shooting to make full use of some of the functions on offer here, too.


  • The Sony A7 II is the best all-round A7-series camera yet, offering significantly improved ergonomics and customisability, more video options, faster autofocusing and startup times, better build quality and the headline-grabbing and very effective 5-axis image stabilisation system. It is slightly bigger and quite a bit heavier than the original A7, but that's a small price to pay for the improvements that Sony have made.


  • - Wifi with NFC and downloadable apps.


  • The Sony A7 II is a superb camera that has all the benefits of a full-frame sensor without the bulk. It has good AF, superb image stabilization and produces very high quality images in a wide range of conditions.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V has an incredible zoom range and an excellent EVF, but its images suffer when the light gets low.


  • We liked last year's HX60V, but with slightly underwhelming image quality and no EVF or lens barrel control ring like the competition from Panasonic, it couldn't quite compete. Sony has clearly listened though and the Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V addresses most of our concerns.
    The move to an 18.2MP Exmor R sensor has given the HX90V a much-needed image quality boost, and although the results are no better than the class-leading Panasonic TZ70, they're certainly on a par, whether shooting in daylight or indoors.


  • With the HX90V/HX90, Sony presents a serious contender for the title of best 30x compact: it provides all-round performance, a plethora of features and is the only model to offer an electronic viewfinder, adjustable screen and customisable settings ring, all in one compact package. Indeed, despite having all these features, it's still the most compact camera of its kind. Unfortunately, this all makes for a relatively high RRP.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II could be considered the on the market. Where most bridge cameras offer little more than an oversized lens, the RX10 II blends a useful zoom range with a wide aperture, a larger than average sensor, tough weather-resistant construction and a wide selection of advanced features.
    Its 1-inch sensor may still be smaller those used in DSLRs and most CSCs, but it gives much-improved image quality over the 1/2.3-inch sensors in typical bridge cameras.


  • - The Sony RX10 II is a versatile stills shooter, but it stands out even further on video.
    - Quicker backroom computing power is one of the most important upgrades since last year’s model.
    - It’s an excellent EVF, though, among the best available at present.
    - The Sony RX10 II isn’t small, and it certainly isn’t cheap.


  • - Somewhat narrow and vertically uneven coverage from built in strobe at wide-angle.
    - Many apps are payware, and often surprisingly expensive compared to much more complex smartphone apps.
    - Performance is degraded slightly if you shoot in raw format.
    - Default colors somewhat muted compared to most cameras.
    - Corners can be a bit soft wide-open, especially at telephoto.
    - Rear control dial is too small and has poor feel with little feedback.
    - Very versatile 24 to 200mm-equivalent zoom range.


  • The Sony A5100 is proof that appearances can be deceptive. Although it looks almost identical to the previous A500 model, the new A5100 is a much more capable camera, especially when it comes to focusing and recording video. It's also a much more compact alternative to its big brother, the A6000, especially as it offers a lot of the same features and even out-performs that model in a few areas.
    One of the main reasons for considering the A5100 is the significantly improved Fast Hybrid AF system that's trickled down from the A6000.


  • A well-performing camera that has just a few small let-downs. A good range of features for the beginner photographer.


  • The Sony A5100 won't appeal to all as it's sometimes fussy to use given its lack of control dials. If that's what you're after then look to the Sony A6000 which caters for such needs, along with the addition of a viewfinder and hotshoe which the A5100 lacks. Whether you venture into buying additional E-mount lenses in the future or not almost doesn't matter with a camera such as this.


Top 5 sony camera for wildlife photography:

  1. Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
  2. Sony A7 II
  3. Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
  4. Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 II
  5. Sony A5100