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The best Sony touchscreen cameras are released under the Alpha and Cyber-shot product lines. Our listing of such top-rated products include the DSLRs and compact point and shoot cameras; some of them are even ultra-zoom, ultra-compact and compact system cameras. Available in wide variety of colors, the best touchscreen cameras from Sony are available at a price of at least $500.

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Sony A5100

Sony A5100


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Sony A5100
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX30
Sony Alpha NEX-5T
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX10
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX30
Sony A5100
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX30 Smartphone Attachable Lens Style Camera
Sony Alpha NEX-5T Digital Camera - Body Only
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX10 Smartphone Attachable Lens-Style Camera
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX30 Digital Camera
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Release Date
Sep 2014
Oct 2014
Aug 2013
Sep 2013
Feb 2013
Touchscreen Panel
Touchscreen Panel
Touchscreen Panel
Touchscreen Panel
Touchscreen Panel
Touchscreen Panel
Camera Type
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Compact
Digital camera - Mirrorless system, Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Lens-style Camera, Compact
Ultra-Compact, Ultracompact
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
Exmor RTM CMOS, BSI-CMOS
BSI-CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.3 in.
Image Sensor Size
28.2 mm
2.5 mm
28.12 mm
2.5 mm
7.66 mm

  • The Sony A5100 is proof that appearances can be deceptive. Although it looks almost identical to the previous A500 model, the new A5100 is a much more capable camera, especially when it comes to focusing and recording video. It's also a much more compact alternative to its big brother, the A6000, especially as it offers a lot of the same features and even out-performs that model in a few areas.
    One of the main reasons for considering the A5100 is the significantly improved Fast Hybrid AF system that's trickled down from the A6000.


  • A well-performing camera that has just a few small let-downs. A good range of features for the beginner photographer.


  • The Sony A5100 won't appeal to all as it's sometimes fussy to use given its lack of control dials. If that's what you're after then look to the Sony A6000 which caters for such needs, along with the addition of a viewfinder and hotshoe which the A5100 lacks. Whether you venture into buying additional E-mount lenses in the future or not almost doesn't matter with a camera such as this.


  • Once again, Sony has produced something which is capable of producing some excellent images, but it has a unique set of quirks when it comes to usability that you only get with QX cameras.
    The idea behind these cameras that they give you lots more flexibility than your average smartphone, and of course, that is true, but when using it becomes so much more difficult than your phone - or indeed - a standard smartphone, the appeal of them starts to wear off.


  • Sony's Alpha NEX-5T mirrorless camera is simply last year's NEX-5R with added NFC support for quick image transfer to a smartphone. And the price has come down. So this isn't a bad thing.


  • Ultimately the new Sony NEX-5T is once again a likable and easy to recommend compact system camera which literally feels better balanced with the 16-50mm lens. Still Highly Recommended then, but we'd expect to see next year's inevitable update make some real strides forward.

  • Rating Unavailable

    If you're someone who purchased last year's Sony NEX-5R ILC model, you aren't going to want to upgrade the recently released NEX-5T, as the two cameras very similar. The NEX-5T introduces NEC wireless capabilities to this family of ILC models, but otherwise the 5R and 5T are basically the same camera. That doesn't mean the Sony NEX-5T isn't a great camera. It offers very good image quality, an articulated LCD, built-in Wi-Fi and fast response times, all of which you'll find in one of the smaller mirrorless ILC cameras on the market.


  • Ultimately the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX10 just falls a little short, regardless of whether you're a smartphone or compact shooter. It doesn't quite come up to scratch in terms of performance, feature-set or image quality, and is also a little over-priced too, perhaps inevitable given that it's a first-generation product. At the moment we'd choose a smartphone and wi-fi enabled compact to quickly share images, though that solution has its own challenges.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot QX10 is a compact, but not ultra-compact digital camera, with Wi-Fi for a direct connection to your smartphone, running Android or iOS. Without the connection you can still take photos but will be left to guesswork regarding whether you are getting the photo you want.

    The camera does not have a flash, and can not use the LED from your smartphone, therefore in darkness, you may actually be better off using your smartphone with LED flash, than the QX10.


  • Why are people still buying these cameras? Is it the big screen, the colors? We know it's not the user experience. So... what then? We've heard it before: Touchscreens move units. But why? This isn't a phone; it's a camera, and cameras need buttons. Otherwise they'll handle like the TX30.

    Every spring we hear it over again: "I need a camera. It has to be cute and I have to be able to spill a drink on it." We also hear: "...and it has to cost less than $100," but let's not get greedy.


  • The Cyber-shot DSC-TX30 is an ultra-thin rugged camera for those who don't want to worry about the camera getting a little wet. It's certainly not for divers, as the touchscreen display does not work underwater. The otherwise beautiful OLED display is also difficult to see outdoors. The flash is very weak, and battery life is poor. Photo quality is decent for its class, though details are smudged when viewed full size. Since it lacks the GPS of its peers, the TX30 isn't a great value, either.


  • All the main camera manufacturers have produced waterproof cameras, but Sony's tend to stand out from the crowd as they look more like a normal camera, rather than some of the tough models that are also available. This doesn't mean the TX30 isn't tough - it's waterproof to 10m as well as being dust, freeze and shock proof. Adding to its stylish look, the 3.3 inch LCD touch screen fills the rear of the camera, with no buttons except for those on the top.