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The best party pics are casual, sporty and spontaneous. The best camera should ideally be easy to carry around with fast response times and a great flash. Our selection of the best cameras for party pictures include the light weight cameras which have fast response times (atleast 3 frames per second.

Since you will be shooting a lot indoors, this means you must pick a camera that has very good flash and white balance control with automatic settings for a variety of lighting situation. Sometimes it is better to increase the ISO setting instead of using a flash, so look for a camera that can give good picture quality (and less noise) at higher ISO levels. If you are a serious party photographer you can also check out accessories like flash diffuser along with your camera.

Lower lighting also means slower shutter speed and wider aperture. The best cameras for party pictures come with good image stabilization feature and will complement photos taken at slower shutter speed.You want your party pictures to be fun and capturing some candid moments, not as a group of people posing for pictures. Point and shoot cameras will be ideal for the purpose.

Parties are great places to capture spontaneous expressions and the best way to capture them is by shooting in continuous mode (or burst mode). There are point and shoot cameras with configurable frames per second and duration of the burst. The best cameras for party photos also come with twist-able LCD panel and good video capabilities which can help to capture some great moments.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras For Party Photos »

Fuji XQ2

Fujifilm XQ2


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Fujifilm XQ2
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5
Nikon Coolpix S7000
Fujifilm FinePix XP80
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-WX220
Fujifilm XQ2
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5
Nikon Coolpix S7000
Fujifilm FinePix XP80
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-WX220
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Release Date
Mar 2015
Oct 2014
Apr 2015
Mar 2015
Aug 2014
Frames Per Second
12.0 Frames
5.8 Frames
9.2 Frames
10.0 Frames
10.0 Frames
Weight
0.45 lb.
0.47 lb.
0.36 lb.
0.39 lb.
0.27 lb.
Camera Type
Ultracompact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Ultracompact
Compact
Ultracompact
Optical Zoom
4.0 x
20.0 x
5.0 x
10.0 x
Resolution
12.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
2.7 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
3.6 mm
21.64 mm
2.5 mm
2.5 mm
2.5 mm

  • The Fujifilm XQ2 is a pocket-friendly camera that is capable of capturing excellent images.


  • Calling the Fujifilm XQ2 a modest upgrade is something of an understatement - it's identical to the original XQ1 camera, except for a faster image proccesor, new Classic Chrome film simulation, new white colour-way, and a slightly lower official price on launch. In all other respects, it's impossible to tell the two cameras apart, which is disappointing given the 18-month gap between them, and ultimately means that Fujifilm's premium compact camera has fallen some way behind the fast-moving competition.


  • A thoroughly enjoyable camera to use. It does everything pretty well but falls short of challenging the very best in its class – a 1-inch sensor, better lens and a tilting touch-screen would potentially make the difference.


  • Like its predecessor, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 packs an image sensor that's much larger than you'd expect, resulting in a pocket-friendly camera that can go toe to toe with larger interchangeable lens models in terms of image quality.


  • Yes, the current cheapest option at £700 might seem a lot of money for a smaller that average compact system camera that as a result resembles a stylish point-and-shooter at first glance. And yet, if compared with the likes of the Sony RX100 Mark III available at a similar outlay – which, while excellent, doesn’t offer the opportunity to swap lenses – then the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 starts to make a lot more sense as a proposition in the present market.


  • Superb image quality from a fantastic feat of camera engineering - perhaps the ultimate carry everywhere camera.


  • The Nikon Coolpix S7000 is a simple camera but it offers quite a few useful features which make it appealing, and with a 20x optical zoom, perhaps particularly to those who want a camera to take with them on holiday.
    Although it doesn’t offer full manual control, at least you can change a few key settings (such as sensitivity), and handily, the autofocus point.
    It’s also quite a fun camera to use, with a nice range of digital effects, the ability to create panoramas and other nifty features such as the ability to create a video comprised of short clips with an added soundtrack.


  • A basic but well-specced camera that's worth considering if you're looking for a long zoom compact that will let you capture pleasing images on your next trip with the minimum of fuss.
    Offering a neat little package for your money, the S7000 performs well and boasts some useful features that will appeal to those looking for a simple family or holiday camera.
    The Nikon S7000 offers versatility and value for money.


  • The Fujifilm FinePix XP80 is a good all round compact camera, which is ideal if you’re the type of person who likes to go on adventure holidays - or, alternatively if you’re just looking for something which will be able to withstand average family life.
    Although picture quality may not be quite as high as some cameras without such rugged credentials, for a holiday or family camera, it’s still pretty good and you should be pleased with what it can produce.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The FinePix XP80 from Fujifilm is a nice point-n-shoot camera that will work well for the beginning photographer seeking waterproof capabilities in a simplistic model. This camera's images are surprisingly sharp for such a basic camera with a small image sensor. Another pleasing surprise is that the XP80 has very little shutter lag when the lighting conditions are good. However, color representation and exposure are a little off with the XP80.


  • The Fujfilm XP80 offers affordable durability in a compact package.
    ISO 6400 (reduced file size). The Fujifilm XP80 is excellent for shooting right in the middle of the action. The 10 fps burst speed is among the best for the category. The video capabilities and wide range of mounting options makes it a good choice for mounting on a bike, surfboard, or whatever else you can imagine. It's not a good option for shooting indoors, however.


  • Conventional wisdom suggests that the smaller the camera, the lower its image quality. Whilst that’s still mainly true, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-WX220 does pack a hefty punch for such a slimline snapper. You’ll be very hard-pressed to tell its photos apart from the bigger, pricier DSC-WX350 thanks to the well-resolved detail, punchy colour reproduction and unobtrusive noise levels.


  • Reasonably priced, with good performance, a decent zoom range and fine in-camera processing abilities, the WX220 is a good choice for an all-round compact.