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The best cameras in the $700 price point for 2016 are the interchangeable lens cameras, the micro four thirds camera platform as well as the entry level d-SLRs.

The mirror-less cameras are at the cutting edge of digital photography. They act as bridge cameras between the point-and-shoot and the dSLRs. If you want the flexibility of multiple lenses and full manual controls but a slimmer form factor than the bulky dSLR's then the ILC cameras or the micro four thirds cameras provide good options. Though these cameras are sans mirror boxes and through-the-lens viewfinders of d-SLR's ,the image quality is impressive. Sony and Samsung have heated up the market with their offerings which are ultra-compact and have the APS-C sized sensor used in d-SLR's.

One of the things to consider while going for a mirror-less camera is the presence of the optical viewfinder needed for continuous shooting modes, used for capturing action shots.

Also available in the sub-$700 range are some of the entry level dSLR's, like those from Nikon and Canon. Though for this price only the camera body is included and you need to shell out more for the lens and external flash etc. The beginner dSLR models from Canon and Nikon have a nice mix of auto and manual modes which help for a smooth transition for beginners from the point-and-shoot cameras. Nikon also offers a Guide mode similar to a on-screen help for SLR newbies.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras Under $700 of 2016 »

Olympus OM-D E-M10 II

Olympus OM-D E-M10 II


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Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Fujifilm X-T10
Ricoh GR II
Samsung NX500
Panasonic Lumix GF7
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Fujifilm X-T10
Ricoh GR II
Samsung NX500
Panasonic Lumix GF7
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Release Date
Sep 2015
Jun 2015
Aug 2015
Mar 2015
Dec 2014
Camera Type
SLR-style mirrorless
SLR-style mirrorless
Large sensor compact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Resolution
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
28.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
21.64 mm
28.28 mm
28.42 mm
28.26 mm
21.64 mm

  • The Olympus OM-D E-M10 II is an evolutionary upgrade of 2014's E-M10 camera, principally adding an even better electronic viewfinder, 5-axis image stabilisation system, very useful fully electronic shutter, and AF targeting pad and focus stacking features, along with a better control layout.


  • The OM-D E-M10 II embodies what the Olympus OM-D series is all about; it's a high quality camera that feels great, offers an extensive feature set with bags of control and produces superb quality images yet doesn't take up much space in your bag.


  • The OM-D E-M10 Mark II is a great camera that's packed with the very best Olympus design and technology. Like its stablemates, it has a sleek retro look, a 16-Megapixel CMOS sensor and a speedy autofocus, but new technology like Focus Bracketing and five-axis stabilisation take it even further. It's straight-forward, effective and attractive. We just wish Olympus would update its over-complex menus!.


  • The mirrorless X-T10 is the best camera Fujifilm offers at a sub-$1,000 price point, but its burst shooting duration is disappointing.


  • The Fujifilm X-T10 successfully repackages most of the core features of the flagship X-T1 camera into a smaller, lighter and cheaper body, and it's also the first X-series camera to benefit from the brand new auto-focusing system, resulting in a mid-range camera that offers a lot of advanced functionality.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Fujifilm X-T10 is a fantastic enthusiast level ILC. Sporting the 16-Megapixel X-Trans imaging sensor, EXR Processor II, Full 1080p HD video and total shooting control on the camera make it lots of fun to use. Performance and image quality will not let you down either.


  • It's hard to get excited about a new camera that principally only adds wi-fi and NFC connectivity to its predecessor. The new Ricoh GR II certainly takes the title of "Smallest Upgrade Ever", with just a handful of other minor new features to justify the full RRP of £599.99 / $799.


  • The Ricoh GR Digital II is a specialised tool for use alongside your other camera(s). It doesn’t do much, but what it does, it does exceptionally well – architectural interiors and exteriors, landscapes and ‘street’ photography are where this camera shines


  • - The menu also offers a wide range of control over picture style and quality.
    - Perhaps more important than anything else though is the sheer pleasure of using the GR Digital II.
    - More importantly it is a genuine pleasure to use and encourages creative photography.
    - Shooting at 80 ISO with noise reduction turned on there is absolutely no trace of image noise and the resulting pictures are among the best I've ever seen from a compact camera.


  • - At around ISO 6400 and higher, though, detail loss is quite noticeable with a lot of blotchiness and smearing from the NR processing.
    - Image quality drops when shooting high-speed continuous mode.
    - No OLPF means sharper images, but also more susceptible to aliasing artifacts when used with a sharp lens.
    - No built-in flash (but small external flash is included).
    - Compact, lightweight design -- a great travel camera.


  • The Samsung NX500 is a solid mirrorless camera with 4K recording capabilities, but it requires you to take some extra steps to edit video.


  • The new Samsung NX500 is by far the cheapest interchangeable lens camera to offer 4K video recording, coming in at less than half the price of the flagship NX1 whilst cramming in most of that camera's features into the design of the more compact previous NX300 model. It isn't quite as simple as NX1 meets NX300, though, as the NX500 makes quite a few concessions, particularly on the video side, to hit both the aggressive price point and to the compact dimensions.


  • Smaller, lighter and better looking than its predecessor, the new Panasonic Lumix GF7 is an that's particularly well-suited to its target audience of smartphone/entry-level compact camera owners looking for better image quality and more features.
    The GF7's increased focus on taking better selfies is no gimmick, with the tilting screen and a range of genuinely useful modes on offer to make it easier to take them, improve them and share them.


  • Familiar fantastic Panasonic image quality in a fun, light and easy-to use body with a tilting touchscreen and Wi-Fi.


  • The Panasonic Lumix GF7 gets plenty right, delivering an affordable, easy-to-use entry-level system that's not trying to reinvent the wheel, but build upon the series' heritage. Solid image quality in good light, a decent autofocus system that's hard to beat, improved Wi-Fi and, of course, that tilt-angle selfie screen are all successes in their own right.


Top 5 digital camera under $700 of 2016:

  1. Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
  2. Fujifilm X-T10
  3. Ricoh GR II
  4. Samsung NX500
  5. Panasonic Lumix GF7