By .

Our list of best interchangeable-lens digital cameras is the combination of compact system cameras (mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras) and the professional DSLR cameras. With the inclusion of many helpful manual controls, the interchangeable lens cameras offer much better performance when compared to point and shoot compact cameras. The cameras not using mirror system are found to be much less bulkier than the SLR cameras with mirror system.

Interchangeable lens cameras allow you to change the lens as per the particular situation and photographic need while composing a shot. On purchasing a latest digital camera now, may seem outdated after some time, and purchasing of a interchangeable lens camera gives you the freedom of upgrading to a higher quality lens in the future.

DSLRs:
The best professional DSLR cameras are the perfect interchangeable lens cameras with the power and flexibility of full manual controls at hefty price tags. Check out our buying guide for the professional DSLR cameras.

Compact system cameras:
The best compact system cameras offer flexibility along with attractive characteristics of portability and versatility. Without sacrificing the portability, these mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras cater amateurs and professionals needs filling the gap between point and shoot compact cameras and the professional DSLRs. Because of the mirror elimination in the compact system cameras, there can be a significant reduction in its size of the camera, making them more pocketable pocket.

Browse All Top Interchangeable-lens Digital Cameras »

Canon EOS 760D

Canon EOS 760D


#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Canon EOS 760D
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Fujifilm X-T10
Nikon D7200
Sony A7 II
Canon EOS 760D
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Fujifilm X-T10
Nikon D7200
Sony A7 II
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
[?]
ReviewGist
Score
Release Date
Sep 2015
Sep 2015
Jun 2015
Apr 2015
Mar 2015
Interchangeable Lens
Interchangeable Lens
Interchangeable Lens
Interchangeable Lens
Interchangeable Lens
Interchangeable Lens
Camera Type
Compact SLR
SLR-style mirrorless
SLR-style mirrorless
Mid-size SLR
SLR-style mirrorless
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
26.81 mm
21.64 mm
28.28 mm
28.2 mm
43.04 mm

  • - HDMI output only functions when Wi-Fi/NFC is disabled.
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance settings too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - OVF coverage only 95%, with offset (this will likely change with sample variation).
    - Built-in flash can act as master to off-camera slave flash units.
    - Competitive though unexceptional burst speed for its class.
    - Excellent color and hue accuracy with manual white balance.
    - Very good high ISO performance for a 24-megapixel APS-C model.


  • This camera produces the same superb image quality as the 750D, but its better handling, helpful secondary LCD and electronic level makes it our choice of the two models. It's almost like a smaller, lighter 70D, with a better sensor.


  • - This camera is still pretty rugged, though, and will be able to handle some abuse.
    - Resolution is 1,040k-dot, offering good sharpness.
    - The viewfinder is good, but not class-leading.
    - Canon’s implementation of wireless tech is great too.


  • The OM-D E-M10 II embodies what the Olympus OM-D series is all about; it's a high quality camera that feels great, offers an extensive feature set with bags of control and produces superb quality images yet doesn't take up much space in your bag.


  • The OM-D E-M10 Mark II is a great camera that's packed with the very best Olympus design and technology. Like its stablemates, it has a sleek retro look, a 16-Megapixel CMOS sensor and a speedy autofocus, but new technology like Focus Bracketing and five-axis stabilisation take it even further. It's straight-forward, effective and attractive. We just wish Olympus would update its over-complex menus!.


  • The Olympus OM-D E-M10 II is an evolutionary upgrade of 2014's E-M10 camera, principally adding an even better electronic viewfinder, 5-axis image stabilisation system, very useful fully electronic shutter, and AF targeting pad and focus stacking features, along with a better control layout.


  • - While the FujiFilm X-T10 is among the best CSCs at the price for image quality, it’s not quite as competitive on video quality.
    - The FujiFilm X-T10 is not weather-proofed, meaning it’s not designed to shoot in torrential downpours without risk of some moisture getting into the insides.
    - Plenty of manual controls.
    - You get full DSLR-style control with the FujiFilm X-T10.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Fujifilm X-T10 is a fantastic enthusiast level ILC. Sporting the 16-Megapixel X-Trans imaging sensor, EXR Processor II, Full 1080p HD video and total shooting control on the camera make it lots of fun to use. Performance and image quality will not let you down either.


  • The mirrorless X-T10 is the best camera Fujifilm offers at a sub-$1,000 price point, but its burst shooting duration is disappointing.


  • - Sensitivities greater than ISO 25,600-equivalent are only available in black-and-white mode.
    - Full-time autofocus is slow to respond, and prone to hunting or seeking in the wrong direction.
    - Metering and function buttons are tough to reach if your hands aren't large.
    - Built-in Wi-Fi functionality is rough around the edges, and has a limited feature-set.


  • Rather than completely changing the design and way the D7200 works, Nikon has made a few incremental upgrades which tweaks the camera to make it even more appealing than its predecessor (which was also pretty great). It’s designed for enthusiasts, which means that it needs to be good at a wide variety of different subject matters - and happily, the D7200 is.
    Whether you feel you want to upgrade from the D7100 is questionable and it may come down to the type of subjects you like to shoot.


  • The Nikon D7200 really pulls it out of the bag where it matters. From enhanced image quality to improved autofocus performance, it's a solid enthusiast DSLR that rights many of the wrongs of its predecessor. In particular there's no longer prevalent banding when making raw file adjustments, which is the biggest issue of the earlier D7100. For all its good, however, there's one key downside: the lack of a vari-angle LCD feels amiss, particularly considering the competition and movie mode improvements.


  • The Sony A7 II is a superb camera that has all the benefits of a full-frame sensor without the bulk. It has good AF, superb image stabilization and produces very high quality images in a wide range of conditions.


  • - Its battery stamina is poor without the VG-C2EM battery grip, the lens library is still limited and it’s a noisy operator among CSCs.
    - The one disappointment is something closer to the basics: battery life.
    - Sony has redesigned the grip, offering a more substantial DSLR-like feel, and rearranged the controls to provide more intuitive operation.
    - For the most part the EVF is great.


  • The Sony A7 II is the best all-round A7-series camera yet, offering significantly improved ergonomics and customisability, more video options, faster autofocusing and startup times, better build quality and the headline-grabbing and very effective 5-axis image stabilisation system. It is slightly bigger and quite a bit heavier than the original A7, but that's a small price to pay for the improvements that Sony have made.


The best mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras with their sleeker and slimmer form factors and dSLR-like image quality are carving out a niche in the digital camera market and are all set to increase their share of the pie in the future.

The mirrorless cameras were originally available as the micro four thirds system from Panasonic and Olympus, using the four thirds sensor. Samsung and Sony use the more advanced APS-C sized sensor also used in dSLR's which promises top notch picture quality. Of late Nikon has also jumped on to the ILC bandwagon. The best interchangeable lens cameras offer an attractive proposition for the amateur hobbyist who wants to delve into some serious photography but balks at the idea of carrying a heavy dSLR. For eg the SONY NEX series is touted as the world's smallest ILC cameras.

However there are some caveats in some of the models which may put off more serious photo enthusiasts. Primarily they are the lack of optical viewfinder, in-built flash and proprietary lens mount(as in the case of Sony and Samsung).

Top 5 interchangeable-lens digital camera:

  1. Canon EOS 760D
  2. Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
  3. Fujifilm X-T10
  4. Nikon D7200
  5. Sony A7 II