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The best camcorders for low light recording have atleast one CCD sensor, the 3 CCD ones being the best.

A few factors that affect low light performance are aperture, (lower is better), lens diameter (bigger is better), sensor size (larger is better), and sensitivity (lower lux is better). When you are scouting the horizon for the best camcorder for low-light, remember that more number of sensor chips (3 CCD) does not mean more light intake, but a smaller number of sensor pixels that are much larger than usual in size, does. A back-illuminated sensor also means higher sensitivity and better low-light performance. Camcorders for low light are good indoor outdoor camcorders suitable for use in the evenings and at night.

Browse All Top Camcorders For Low Light »

Canon Vixia HF G10

Canon Vixia HF G10  32 GB  Flash Media  Hard Drive Camcorder


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Canon Vixia HF G10
Panasonic HDC-TM900K
JVC Everio GS-TD1
Panasonic HDC-SD90
JVC GC-PX10
Canon Vixia HF G10  32 GB  Flash Media  Hard Drive Camcorder
Panasonic HDC-TM900K Camcorder
JVC Everio GS-TD1 High Definition 3D Camcorder
Panasonic HDC-SD90K Camcorder
JVC GC-PX10 Camcorder
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Release Date
Feb 2011
Jan 2011
Apr 2011
Feb 2011
Sep 2011
CCD Quantity
1.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
HDD Size
32.0 GB
32.0 GB
64.0 GB
Optical Zoom
10.0 x
12.0 x
10.0 x
21.0 x
10.0 x
Recording Format
Flash Media, AVCHD
Flash Media, High Definition, AVC, H.264, MPEG
Flash Media, High Definition
AVCHD, MEPG-4, AVC, H.264, High Definition
MP4
Recording System
NTSC
NTSC
NTSC, PAL
NTSC
Camcorder Type
Digital
Digital
Digital, 3D
Digital, 3D
Digital
Memory Still Resolution
2.07 MegaPixels
14.2 MegaPixels
3.32 MegaPixels
3.32 MegaPixels
12.0 MegaPixels
Recordable Media
Flash Media
Flash Media
High Definition
High Definition, Flash Media, AVCHD
Flash Media, H.264
Use
Video, Photo Viewing
Video
Video
Video, Photo Viewing
Video

  • While it's got a great shooter feature set and good video quality, the Canon Vixia HF G10 still feels a bit expensive for what it offers.


  • We're impressed with the HF G10 in terms of performance and capability, but the camcorder's $1499 price tag may be too high for most consumers. You are getting a lot for your money, though, and for people who want access to professional-grade controls, paying around $1500 for a camcorder isn't that bad. If you have more cash to spend, Canon does have the professional XA10 camcorder, which is identical to the HF G10 except it has a removable handlebar with XLR audio ports (and it costs around $2000).


  • The Canon VIXIA HF G10 is a camcorder built for ease of use and high quality recording. While the CMOS sensor is a basic 2 megapixel sensitivity that creates 1920 x 1080 resolution video, the lens is of a high quality that enables up to 10x optical zoom.


  • Panasonic's trio of prosumer camcorders, the hard-disk-based HDC-HS900 and flash-based TM900 and SD800, deliver generally excellent video quality and provide the full set of manual controls and features advanced users want. But you have to be willing to baby the white balance a bit. The TM900 is my top pick of the three for its EVF, but if you're on a tight budget the SD800 should suit just fine.


  • The HDC-TM900 (MSRP $1099) is a great camcorder, that much is clear. It captured excellent video in a variety of record modes, and its performance recording 1080/60p HD video was as good as it gets. It has a ton of controls, a solid body design, and its 3D recording option (with the purchase of an optional conversion lens) makes it a cutting-edge product.

    Despite all this, we are still disappointed with the TM900. Other than adding the 3D capability and increasing the size of the LCD, Panasonic didn't do much to improve on last year's HDC-TM700â??


  • Panasonic's HDC-TM900 offers no revolutionary new features, now that 3D shooting has already started its journey to ubiquity. But like its predecessors it blends excellent enthusiast features, headlined by the lens ring, with supreme image quality. There's also no significant premium being charged for this new model compared to the outgoing TM700, if you can still find it. So the TM900 takes over from its predecessor as our videomaking enthusiast camcorder of choice.


  • If you are in the market for a high-end 3D camcorder you only have three options at the moment: the JVC GS-TD1, the Sony HDR-TD10, and the Panasonic HDC-SDT750 (and other Panasonic models that can use the VW-CLT1 3D conversion lens). There are also a few ultracompact models that shoot 3D, as well as a number of digital cameras, but the three models mentioned above are the only high-end HD camcorders aimed at consumers that allow 3D recording. Of those three models, the GS-TD1 is the second 3D camcorder weâÂ? Â? ve reviewedâÂ?


  • The JVC GS-TD1 is a high-end camcorder, promoted by JVC as the first consumer level camcorder to offer full HD 3D recording. The GS-TD1's full HD 3D capability is owed to the high speed processor that can simultaneously produce two full HD images (1920 x 1080i), recording in both the left and right streams (a process that JVC refers to as LR Independent Format).


  • With the Everio GS-TD1, JVC has produced the first consumer-grade camcorder to shoot two frames of Full HD in 3D mode, using a pair of parallel lenses and CMOS sensors. The resulting MP4 format is proprietary, but JVC’s approach also means better low-light performance even when shooting 3D in AVCHD mode. It’s the first consumer-grade camcorder to offer optical zoom in 3D mode, too. With a range of manual features as well, the GS-TD1 has loads to offer enthusiasts wishing to move into 3D.


  • The Panasonic HDC-SD90 is a mid-cost camcorder. This camcorder's iA (Intelligent Auto) feature selects the most suitable shooting mode at the press of a button. This feature includes Face Recognition, which finds the faces of registered people (up to six faces can be registered) and optimizes the focus and exposure for them.


  • The 3D compatibility may be the biggest headline for the HDC-SD90, but at its core this is essentially a very well featured midrange HD camcorder. If your budget can't quite stretch to a high-end model, this model would make a very acceptable compromise. With more enthusiast features than similarly priced competitors, and equal or better image quality, the HDC-SD90 gives you plenty for your money, with the added bonus of 3D if you're feeling a bit more flush.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Panasonic HDC-SD90 is well built and has good ergonomics with an intuitive touchscreen control. It has a bright lens plus decent lens reach and feature set but is relatively expensive and clad in a plastic-y high gloss case.


  • With its clumsy design and terrible user interface, we can honestly say JVC failed in their attempt at making a true photo/video "hybrid" device. Solely for recording video, however, the JVC GC-PX10 is not a complete waste of time but it is still seriously overpriced for what you get.


  • The JVC GC-PX10 is marketed as a hybrid camera that is equally adept at video and still-image capture, but its ergonomics are better suited for recording video than they are for shooting standard photos.

  • Rating Unavailable

    If you're looking for one camera that shoots it all, including high-speed video and stills, then be sure to check out JVC's GC-PX10 hybrid.


Top 5 camcorder for low light:

  1. Canon Vixia HF G10 32 GB Flash Media Hard Drive Camcorder
  2. Panasonic HDC-TM900K Camcorder
  3. JVC Everio GS-TD1 High Definition 3D Camcorder
  4. Panasonic HDC-SD90K Camcorder
  5. JVC GC-PX10 Camcorder