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The best cameras under $800 for 2016 sit between the advanced ILC (interchangeable lens cameras) and the entry level dSLR's. If you have progressed from the compact point-and-shoot cameras and want to enjoy the flexibility of shooting with multiple lenses and various attachments then you have a wide range of options to choose from if you are looking for the best under $800.

On offer are the best interchangeable lens cameras which are less bulky than the dSLR's but come with interchangeable lenses and offer topnotch image quality.

Due to the mirrorless design they are significantly lighter than the dSLR's and can appeal to the beginner turning enthusiast user. For eg the highly acclaimed SONY NEX series is touted as the lightest interchangeable lens camera in the market today and packs a punch with it's advanced features and sensor. However the lens market for the ILC's is just picking up and the lenses for these cameras can be quite costly, so make a judicious choice before buying.

From the entry-level DSLR stable there are a lot of choices from the stalwarts like Canon, Nikon and Sony. Avid photographers who want more creative control over their pictures and the flexibility of using a host of available lenses would want to invest in the new SLR's in the market today. The dSLR's have advanced sensors for unmatched image quality. However at the sub-800$ range only a kit lens may be included and you need to dig deeper into your pocket to get a full range of lenses.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras Under $800 of 2016 »

Fuji X-T10

Fujifilm X-T10


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Fujifilm X-T10
Ricoh GR II
Samsung NX500
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7
Panasonic Lumix GF7
Fujifilm X-T10
Ricoh GR II
Samsung NX500
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7
Panasonic Lumix GF7
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Release Date
Jun 2015
Aug 2015
Mar 2015
Jun 2015
Dec 2014
Camera Type
SLR-style mirrorless
Large sensor compact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
SLR-style mirrorless
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Resolution
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
28.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
28.28 mm
28.42 mm
28.26 mm
21.64 mm
21.64 mm

  • The mirrorless X-T10 is the best camera Fujifilm offers at a sub-$1,000 price point, but its burst shooting duration is disappointing.


  • The Fujifilm X-T10 successfully repackages most of the core features of the flagship X-T1 camera into a smaller, lighter and cheaper body, and it's also the first X-series camera to benefit from the brand new auto-focusing system, resulting in a mid-range camera that offers a lot of advanced functionality.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Fujifilm X-T10 is a fantastic enthusiast level ILC. Sporting the 16-Megapixel X-Trans imaging sensor, EXR Processor II, Full 1080p HD video and total shooting control on the camera make it lots of fun to use. Performance and image quality will not let you down either.


  • It's hard to get excited about a new camera that principally only adds wi-fi and NFC connectivity to its predecessor. The new Ricoh GR II certainly takes the title of "Smallest Upgrade Ever", with just a handful of other minor new features to justify the full RRP of £599.99 / $799.


  • The Ricoh GR Digital II is a specialised tool for use alongside your other camera(s). It doesn’t do much, but what it does, it does exceptionally well – architectural interiors and exteriors, landscapes and ‘street’ photography are where this camera shines


  • - The menu also offers a wide range of control over picture style and quality.
    - Perhaps more important than anything else though is the sheer pleasure of using the GR Digital II.
    - More importantly it is a genuine pleasure to use and encourages creative photography.
    - Shooting at 80 ISO with noise reduction turned on there is absolutely no trace of image noise and the resulting pictures are among the best I've ever seen from a compact camera.


  • - At around ISO 6400 and higher, though, detail loss is quite noticeable with a lot of blotchiness and smearing from the NR processing.
    - Image quality drops when shooting high-speed continuous mode.
    - No OLPF means sharper images, but also more susceptible to aliasing artifacts when used with a sharp lens.
    - No built-in flash (but small external flash is included).
    - Compact, lightweight design -- a great travel camera.


  • The Samsung NX500 is a solid mirrorless camera with 4K recording capabilities, but it requires you to take some extra steps to edit video.


  • The new Samsung NX500 is by far the cheapest interchangeable lens camera to offer 4K video recording, coming in at less than half the price of the flagship NX1 whilst cramming in most of that camera's features into the design of the more compact previous NX300 model. It isn't quite as simple as NX1 meets NX300, though, as the NX500 makes quite a few concessions, particularly on the video side, to hit both the aggressive price point and to the compact dimensions.


  • The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 is the fifth Panasonic stills camera to offer 4K video and photo shooting, following in the footsteps of the GH4, LX100, FZ1000 and CM1 models. "Introducing 4k to everyone" is the marketing angle that Panasonic are taking with the G7, and we'd agree that this DSLR-like, mid-range compact system camera is the best suited of all those products to expand the appeal of 4K to a wider audience, especially as it now offers additional 4K photo modes.


  • While the G7's design and build may lack the excitement of cameras like the Fuji X-T10, it has a very well-rounded feature set, with a high-quality OLED viewfinder, a vari-angle touchscreen and Wi-Fi connectivity. Image quality is also high.


  • Let's not beat about the bush; Panasonic's Lumix G7 is nearly the perfect interchangeable-lens camera for the majority of users. It's well-built, fairly compact and light, very fast, takes beautiful photos, is gifted in video (4K/UHD!), offers great customizability... It's hard to think of any flaws! All we'd say is that, because Panasonic was so keen that its G7 should do everything well, it perhaps offers a few too many options... Not much of a criticism, really!.


  • Smaller, lighter and better looking than its predecessor, the new Panasonic Lumix GF7 is an that's particularly well-suited to its target audience of smartphone/entry-level compact camera owners looking for better image quality and more features.
    The GF7's increased focus on taking better selfies is no gimmick, with the tilting screen and a range of genuinely useful modes on offer to make it easier to take them, improve them and share them.


  • Familiar fantastic Panasonic image quality in a fun, light and easy-to use body with a tilting touchscreen and Wi-Fi.


  • The Panasonic Lumix GF7 gets plenty right, delivering an affordable, easy-to-use entry-level system that's not trying to reinvent the wheel, but build upon the series' heritage. Solid image quality in good light, a decent autofocus system that's hard to beat, improved Wi-Fi and, of course, that tilt-angle selfie screen are all successes in their own right.


Top 5 digital camera under $800 of 2016:

  1. Fujifilm X-T10
  2. Ricoh GR II
  3. Samsung NX500
  4. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7
  5. Panasonic Lumix GF7