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The best cameras under $600 for 2016 come in all the variants - from the more accomplished point-and-shoots to the micro-four thirds and interchangeable lenses and also includes some of the budget dslr options also. Consequently, the way to find the best camera buy under 600 dollar would be to first consider the exact camera type you are looking for. Under this list of cameras, you could also expect some of the best DSLRs under $600 price range.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras Under $600 of 2016 »

Olympus OM-D E-M10 II

Olympus OM-D E-M10 II


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Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Nikon 1 J5
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
Pentax K-S2
Nikon Coolpix S9900
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Nikon 1 J5
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
Pentax K-S2
Nikon Coolpix S9900
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Release Date
Sep 2015
May 2015
Aug 2015
Apr 2015
Mar 2015
Camera Type
SLR-style mirrorless
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Compact
Compact SLR
Compact
Resolution
16.0 Megapixel
21.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
21.64 mm
13.23 mm
2.5 mm
28.2 mm
2.5 mm

  • The Olympus OM-D E-M10 II is an evolutionary upgrade of 2014's E-M10 camera, principally adding an even better electronic viewfinder, 5-axis image stabilisation system, very useful fully electronic shutter, and AF targeting pad and focus stacking features, along with a better control layout.


  • The OM-D E-M10 II embodies what the Olympus OM-D series is all about; it's a high quality camera that feels great, offers an extensive feature set with bags of control and produces superb quality images yet doesn't take up much space in your bag.


  • The OM-D E-M10 Mark II is a great camera that's packed with the very best Olympus design and technology. Like its stablemates, it has a sleek retro look, a 16-Megapixel CMOS sensor and a speedy autofocus, but new technology like Focus Bracketing and five-axis stabilisation take it even further. It's straight-forward, effective and attractive. We just wish Olympus would update its over-complex menus!.


  • If you're not a serious shutterbug, you'll appreciate the ease of using the fast-shooting Nikon 1 J5 mirrorless camera.


  • While the ability to capture 4K video footage may make all the headlines, the Nikon 1 J5's change in focus to a more prosumer, enthusiast camera is actually the bigger story. The addition of front and rear handgrips, PASM modes on the shooting mode dial, a command dial and Function button all point to a change in direction for the J5, despite it still being a very affordable compact system camera.

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    The Nikon 1 J5 is a nice mirrorless ILC that makes quite a few improvements from the Nikon 1 J4. However, it still has enough minor annoyances that add up quickly to make it lag just behind some similar mirrorless models. Nikon gave the J5 a sharp touchscreen that can tilt up to 180 degrees, as well as a mode dial with plenty of automatic shooting modes that will give inexperienced photographers an easy transition to this ILC. Nikon didn't forget more experienced photographers, who can use the full manual control features.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V has an incredible zoom range and an excellent EVF, but its images suffer when the light gets low.


  • We liked last year's HX60V, but with slightly underwhelming image quality and no EVF or lens barrel control ring like the competition from Panasonic, it couldn't quite compete. Sony has clearly listened though and the Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V addresses most of our concerns.
    The move to an 18.2MP Exmor R sensor has given the HX90V a much-needed image quality boost, and although the results are no better than the class-leading Panasonic TZ70, they're certainly on a par, whether shooting in daylight or indoors.


  • With the HX90V/HX90, Sony presents a serious contender for the title of best 30x compact: it provides all-round performance, a plethora of features and is the only model to offer an electronic viewfinder, adjustable screen and customisable settings ring, all in one compact package. Indeed, despite having all these features, it's still the most compact camera of its kind. Unfortunately, this all makes for a relatively high RRP.


  • The Pentax K-S2 D-SLR packs a lot of features into its weather-sealed body, but its burst shooting capability is very limited and its companion Wi-Fi app needs some work.


  • The Pentax KS-2 has a lot of good things on offer here. While most people are generally swayed towards Canon or Nikon when purchasing their first DSLR, unless you already have some lenses and/or accessories, it’s worth knowing about other options on the market, especially when they are capable of producing some good results.
    For the money, and the level it is aimed at, the Pentax KS-2 offers some excellent features which you wouldn’t always expect.


  • Pentax is pitching the K-S2 as a 'family' camera, but its powerful features, twin control dials and weatherproofing will appeal to enthusiasts too. The specs are like the K-S1's, but the design is much more grown-up.


  • The addition of the versatile vari-angle screen, a dedicated command dial, enhanced GPS tracking and NFC connectivity make the new Coolpix S9900 Nikon's best travel-zoom camera yet, although it doesn't make any great strides forwards in terms of image quality or general performance.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - Not so good are the remote shooting features which remain very basic.
    - The COOLPIX S9900 also adds NFC for easier Wifi connections, allowing you to intitiate wireless transfers and remote control by gently tapping your smartphone against the camera body.


  • The Nikon S9900 offers a very long zoom range in a surprisingly compact body, but there's no overcoming the limitations of the small sensor, and the image quality isn't great – you can't shoot raw files, either.