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This selection of best easy to use cameras for 2016 is characterized by intuitive menus, easy handling and accessible controls for the most common operations. We limit our selection of the best cameras for ease of use to some of the lighter ones which also have a bigger LCD screen sizes(grater than 3 inch).

Beginners using their first digital camera as well as casual photographers do not want to be bogged down by cumbersome controls and confusing menu options. You would rather just like to point, frame and click to capture your memorable moments. The best cameras for ease of use these days are geared towards simple intuitive interfaces. For eg, Canon with their Powershot range and Kodak with their EasyShare range stress on ease of use and are thus very popular with newbies and as a family camera as well.

And now since touchscreen interfaces are making their way to most electronics gadgets many of the camera makers have hopped on to the touchscreen bandwagon. But reactions to touchscreen interfaces for digital cameras are mixed as serious photo enthusiasts still prefer the manual controls as they are more accessible while framing and clicking pictures.

This list of best user-friendly digital cameras achieve a good balance between touchscreen and manual buttons and controls for a overall pleasant user experience.

Browse All Top Easy to Use Camera of 2016 »

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV


Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV was ranked in the best easy to use digital camera at position #1 based on 5 expert digital camera reviews. The reviews considered included ones from sites like Imaging-Resource.com, DigitalTrends.com and PCMag.com.

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Nikon 1 J5
Ricoh GR II
Samsung NX500
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Nikon 1 J5
Ricoh GR II
Samsung NX500
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V
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Release Date
Sep 2015
May 2015
Aug 2015
Mar 2015
Aug 2015
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Weight
0.66 lb.
0.51 lb.
0.55 lb.
0.63 lb.
0.54 lb.
Camera Type
Compact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Large sensor compact
Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Compact
Optical Zoom
2.9 x
1.0 x
30.0 x
Resolution
20.0 Megapixel
21.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
28.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
BSI-CMOS
BSI-CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
BSI-CMOS
Image Sensor Size
13.23 mm
13.23 mm
28.42 mm
28.26 mm
2.5 mm

  • - Macro performance not quite as good as some competitors.
    - Battery life not as good as predecessor (but still fair for its size).
    - Slightly below average saturation levels and hue accuracy.
    - Still can't capture RAW files and JPEGs at the "Extra Fine" highest quality setting.
    - Default Wi-Fi camera app lacks robust functionality; need to install additional (free) app.


  • - Great stills, outstanding video, and loads of features make this an amazing compact cam.
    - The screen is rated 1,228K dots and is very sharp.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV offers serious video improvements over the RX100 III, but it is very expensive for a compact camera.


  • If you're not a serious shutterbug, you'll appreciate the ease of using the fast-shooting Nikon 1 J5 mirrorless camera.


  • While the ability to capture 4K video footage may make all the headlines, the Nikon 1 J5's change in focus to a more prosumer, enthusiast camera is actually the bigger story. The addition of front and rear handgrips, PASM modes on the shooting mode dial, a command dial and Function button all point to a change in direction for the J5, despite it still being a very affordable compact system camera.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Nikon 1 J5 is a nice mirrorless ILC that makes quite a few improvements from the Nikon 1 J4. However, it still has enough minor annoyances that add up quickly to make it lag just behind some similar mirrorless models. Nikon gave the J5 a sharp touchscreen that can tilt up to 180 degrees, as well as a mode dial with plenty of automatic shooting modes that will give inexperienced photographers an easy transition to this ILC. Nikon didn't forget more experienced photographers, who can use the full manual control features.


  • It's hard to get excited about a new camera that principally only adds wi-fi and NFC connectivity to its predecessor. The new Ricoh GR II certainly takes the title of "Smallest Upgrade Ever", with just a handful of other minor new features to justify the full RRP of £599.99 / $799.


  • The Ricoh GR Digital II is a specialised tool for use alongside your other camera(s). It doesn’t do much, but what it does, it does exceptionally well – architectural interiors and exteriors, landscapes and ‘street’ photography are where this camera shines


  • - The menu also offers a wide range of control over picture style and quality.
    - Perhaps more important than anything else though is the sheer pleasure of using the GR Digital II.
    - More importantly it is a genuine pleasure to use and encourages creative photography.
    - Shooting at 80 ISO with noise reduction turned on there is absolutely no trace of image noise and the resulting pictures are among the best I've ever seen from a compact camera.


  • - At around ISO 6400 and higher, though, detail loss is quite noticeable with a lot of blotchiness and smearing from the NR processing.
    - Image quality drops when shooting high-speed continuous mode.
    - No OLPF means sharper images, but also more susceptible to aliasing artifacts when used with a sharp lens.
    - No built-in flash (but small external flash is included).
    - Compact, lightweight design -- a great travel camera.


  • The Samsung NX500 is a solid mirrorless camera with 4K recording capabilities, but it requires you to take some extra steps to edit video.


  • The new Samsung NX500 is by far the cheapest interchangeable lens camera to offer 4K video recording, coming in at less than half the price of the flagship NX1 whilst cramming in most of that camera's features into the design of the more compact previous NX300 model. It isn't quite as simple as NX1 meets NX300, though, as the NX500 makes quite a few concessions, particularly on the video side, to hit both the aggressive price point and to the compact dimensions.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V has an incredible zoom range and an excellent EVF, but its images suffer when the light gets low.


  • We liked last year's HX60V, but with slightly underwhelming image quality and no EVF or lens barrel control ring like the competition from Panasonic, it couldn't quite compete. Sony has clearly listened though and the Cyber-shot DSC-HX90V addresses most of our concerns.
    The move to an 18.2MP Exmor R sensor has given the HX90V a much-needed image quality boost, and although the results are no better than the class-leading Panasonic TZ70, they're certainly on a par, whether shooting in daylight or indoors.


  • With the HX90V/HX90, Sony presents a serious contender for the title of best 30x compact: it provides all-round performance, a plethora of features and is the only model to offer an electronic viewfinder, adjustable screen and customisable settings ring, all in one compact package. Indeed, despite having all these features, it's still the most compact camera of its kind. Unfortunately, this all makes for a relatively high RRP.