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Sports/Action Photography is characterized by the use of specific cameras for action pictures which have a fast shutter speed and great image stabilization so that your images don't come out blurred. The best suited are generally digital SLR's, but expect to spend a lot more on a good lenses. Our selection of the best cameras for action shots for 2016 are limited to the DSLR's which can take pictures at a rapid pace (atleast 3 frames per second).

The best sports/Action photography cameras are equipped with the following key features that are critical to capture superior shots in motion.

Excellent Focus
Best sports action cameras need to be able to focus fast to keep moving objects in focus either using auto focus or manual focus using the lens ring. Also the AF needs to perform well in low light conditions.

Continuous mode shooting
Continuous or burst mode allows for capturing a series of shots in quick succession so that you can choose the sharpest. Typically cameras come with burst mode of 3 fps (frames per second). The best digital cameras for sports can go up to 10 fps. For the best action photos, you need to be able to click at the right moment and also freeze the action, meaning a picture with very minimal blur.

ISO performance
The best sports action camera needs to perform well at high ISO's. Since sensitivity to light is greater at higher ISO's a high ISO setting is required to use the fastest shutter speed.

Faster lens
A faster lens is more sensitive to light. Typically lens of 2.8 or below is used for sports photography

If your budget for sports photography doesn't allow for a DSLR, you can go for one of the latest megazoom models which have pretty good image stabilization and perform well at high ISOs.

Browse All Top Action Shots Digital Cameras of 2016 »

Canon EOS 760D

Canon EOS 760D


Canon EOS 760D: We looked at around 7 expert reviews for Canon EOS 760D from sites like Imaging-Resource.com, PhotographyBLOG.com and CameraLabs.com based on which Canon EOS 760D was ranked as the #1 best digital camera for action shots.

Top Contenders for the Best Action Shots Digital Camera of 2016 Compared:

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Canon EOS 760D
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Fujifilm X-T10
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
Canon EOS 760D
Leica Q (Typ 116)
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II
Fujifilm X-T10
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV
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Release Date
Sep 2015
Jun 2015
Sep 2015
Jun 2015
Sep 2015
Frames Per Second
5.0 Frames
10.0 Frames
8.0 Frames
8.0 Frames
16.0 Frames
Camera Type
Compact SLR
Large sensor compact
SLR-style mirrorless
SLR-style mirrorless
Compact
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
16.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
BSI-CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
26.81 mm
43.26 mm
21.64 mm
28.28 mm
13.23 mm

  • - HDMI output only functions when Wi-Fi/NFC is disabled.
    - Auto and Incandescent white balance settings too warm in tungsten lighting.
    - OVF coverage only 95%, with offset (this will likely change with sample variation).
    - Built-in flash can act as master to off-camera slave flash units.
    - Competitive though unexceptional burst speed for its class.
    - Excellent color and hue accuracy with manual white balance.
    - Very good high ISO performance for a 24-megapixel APS-C model.

  • Rating Unavailable

    - But it’s the 760D’s low noise levels that impress most.
    - The new 24.2MP sensor in the 760D doesn’t just look good on paper; it also generates excellent image quality.
    - Its plastic body is tough and doesn't show any signs of flex, plus you get a generously-sized rubberised rear thumb grip.


  • This camera produces the same superb image quality as the 750D, but its better handling, helpful secondary LCD and electronic level makes it our choice of the two models. It's almost like a smaller, lighter 70D, with a better sensor.


  • The Leica Q (Typ 116) is a niche camera, with a full-frame image sensor and a dedicated 28mm lens. It's not for every photographer, but it's fantastic at what it does.


  • The Leica Q (Typ 116) is the best serious compact camera that Leica have ever released, offering fantastic image quality, great handling and build-quality, and a number of surprisingly innovative features which include very fast auto-focusing, although it's also the most expensive too.
    Offering a unique combination of a 35mm full-frame sensor and fixed 28mm lens, the Leica Q's natural rivals are the now ageing Sony RX1 and RX1R, but they don't offer such a wide or fast lens, a built-in viewfinder, or a touchscreen interface.


  • A superb full-frame compact camera for those who like traditional controls and modern features like an electronic viewfinder. The Q is capable of producing beautiful quality images.


  • The Olympus OM-D E-M10 II is an evolutionary upgrade of 2014's E-M10 camera, principally adding an even better electronic viewfinder, 5-axis image stabilisation system, very useful fully electronic shutter, and AF targeting pad and focus stacking features, along with a better control layout.


  • The OM-D E-M10 II embodies what the Olympus OM-D series is all about; it's a high quality camera that feels great, offers an extensive feature set with bags of control and produces superb quality images yet doesn't take up much space in your bag.


  • The OM-D E-M10 Mark II is a great camera that's packed with the very best Olympus design and technology. Like its stablemates, it has a sleek retro look, a 16-Megapixel CMOS sensor and a speedy autofocus, but new technology like Focus Bracketing and five-axis stabilisation take it even further. It's straight-forward, effective and attractive. We just wish Olympus would update its over-complex menus!.


  • The mirrorless X-T10 is the best camera Fujifilm offers at a sub-$1,000 price point, but its burst shooting duration is disappointing.


  • The Fujifilm X-T10 successfully repackages most of the core features of the flagship X-T1 camera into a smaller, lighter and cheaper body, and it's also the first X-series camera to benefit from the brand new auto-focusing system, resulting in a mid-range camera that offers a lot of advanced functionality.

  • Rating Unavailable

    The Fujifilm X-T10 is a fantastic enthusiast level ILC. Sporting the 16-Megapixel X-Trans imaging sensor, EXR Processor II, Full 1080p HD video and total shooting control on the camera make it lots of fun to use. Performance and image quality will not let you down either.


  • - Macro performance not quite as good as some competitors.
    - Battery life not as good as predecessor (but still fair for its size).
    - Slightly below average saturation levels and hue accuracy.
    - Still can't capture RAW files and JPEGs at the "Extra Fine" highest quality setting.
    - Default Wi-Fi camera app lacks robust functionality; need to install additional (free) app.


  • The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV offers serious video improvements over the RX100 III, but it is very expensive for a compact camera.


  • Sony has made some good improvements to what is already an excellently performing camera, but there are still a few small problems with the RX100 IV which make it just slightly less than perfect. Even if you can put the extremely high price aside (especially as that will drop as time goes on), it remains disappointing not to see a touch sensitive screen on a Sony RX100 - if for no other reason than setting the AF point would be much easier and quicker with one. It’s also frustrating that you have to switch off raw format shooting to make full use of some of the functions on offer here, too.