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Portrait photography is the photography of capturing a person or a group of people in a frame usually focussing them specifically as a subject. Our list of best digital cameras for portraits are the professional DSLR cameras which give you the access of controlling various settings like aperture and ISO.

DSLRs are usually the best for Portrait photography. The key here is to get a great lens. Go for a 50mm f/1.4 lens for a good/expensive option or settle for a cheaper 15-55mm option. The best digital cameras for portraits are the best portrait DSLRs those which have a narrower depth of field so that the subject is sharp and the background is blurred.

Tuning the depth of field as per the required sharpness of the photograph definitely needs adjusting the aperture. Setting right focus using aperture setting also helps you highlight every detail of your portrait photograph and setting a right ISO helps you capture no-noise images. And choosing a greater resolution camera is good for taking prints of your photographs.

Also it is important to have a decent zoom lens to capture from a distance since pictures taken from very close tend to distort some facial features especially the nose. The best digital cameras for portraits have a faster shutter speed to capture expressions of people and is especially helpful when you are taking pictures of kids or pets etc or for street photography. If you prefer a compact camera, then most of the compact cameras come with a Portrait autofocus mode.

The portrait photographs are famous with the photographers who capture them in passport format, and with the other professionals who photograph various people in portrait format.

Some of the best portrait digital cameras are available under the $800 price range from the brands like Nikon, Canon and Sony with a camera resolution of at least 14 Megapixel and HD video recording capability.

Browse All Top Digital Cameras For Portraits »

Pentax K-3

Pentax K-3 SLR Camera - Body Only


Pentax K-3: Pentax K-3 was ranked in the top digital camera for portraits at position #1 based on 9 expert digital camera reviews. The reviews considered included ones from sites like PCMag.com, PhotographyBLOG.com and TechRadar.com.

Top Contenders for the Best Digital Camera For Portraits Compared:

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Pentax K-3
Nikon D610
Nikon D5300
Canon EOS 70D
Canon EOS 700D (EOS Rebel T5i)
Pentax K-3 SLR Camera - Body Only
Nikon D610 24.3 MP CMOS FX-Format Digital SLR Camera (Body Only)
Nikon D5300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera
Canon EOS 700D (EOS Rebel T5i) Digital Camera
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Release Date
Oct 2013
Oct 2013
Oct 2013
Jun 2013
Jun 2013
Camera Type
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional, Compact SLR
SLR/Professional, Mid-size SLR
SLR/Professional, Compact SLR
Resolution
24.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
24.0 Megapixel
20.0 Megapixel
18.0 Megapixel
Image Sensor Type
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
CMOS
LCD Screen Size
3.2 in.
3.2 in.
3.2 in.
3.0 in.
3.0 in.
Image Sensor Size
28.2 mm
43.18 mm
28.2 mm
27.04 mm
26.81 mm

  • The Pentax K-3 is the most refined K-mount SLR to date, offering fast autofocus and superb image quality. Its video autofocus implementation isn't the best, but it still manages to snag our Editors' Choice award.


  • The Pentax K-3 is the most full-featured prosumer DSLR camera on the market, but not only that, it also delivers great performance, weather-resistant build quality, slick handling and excellent image quality too. The K-3 certainly has what it takes to compete with its main rivals, the Canon EOS 70D and Nikon D7100.
    The Pentax K-3 builds on the proven handling of the K-5 II camera.


  • A completely weatherproof body, good image quality and intuitive handling puts the K-3 cat among the pigeons, but there's still work to do if Pentax is to seriously compete with the DSLR options from Canon and Nikon.


  • Though competition's increasing for low-end full-frame cameras, the Nikon D610 holds its own; that said, while slightly faster than its predecessor it's not a whole lot different.


  • That the D610 is lighter than any other Nikon FX digital SLR camera is a real boon to anyone planning to use it for extended periods of time, though be prepared that it's still quite a handful and noticeably heavier than the cheapest auto focus SLRs of the film era (then again, it's a much higher specified model than any of those). The Nikon D610's mirror is surprisingly quiet for a full-frame SLR camera and in normal use it produces only minimal viewfinder blackout.


  • While the Nikon D610 is an excellent camera that's capable of recording plenty of detail in images with rich tones, good exposure and pleasant colours it is considerably more expensive the Canon 6D.


  • So while the Nikon D5300 doesn't add that many new features to the year-old D5200, what it does add makes it a unique product at the mid-range price-point, offering something genuinely different to the likes of the Canon EOS 650D, Pentax K-5 II and the Sony A65. The combination of a free-angle screen, great video mode, high-quality stills and new connectivity options mean that the Nikon D5300 is a worthy winner of our Highly Recommended award.


  • The Nikon D5300 is what's often referred to in the technology world as an 'evolutionary' upgrade. Nikon has abandoned the D5200's optical low pass filter, which might have been considered revolutonary a year ago, but now looks, to borrow a fashion industry term, 'on trend'. That's not to say it's frivolous or unwarranted, given that it improves the D5300's image quality with no apparent drawbacks (Moire wasn't an issue in any of my test shots) it's absolutely the right move.


  • Although the upgrades made to the D5200 by the D5300 are solid, they are unlikely to attract D5200 users to upgrade.
    They may make the camera more attractive to photographers without a brand commitment, but they aren't especially forward-looking or novel. The variangle screen and Effect modes encourage the user to shoot in live view mode (and compose the image on screen), but the live view AF system's performance lags behind that of many compact system cameras, and the screen isn't touch-sensitive.


  • An overall excellent camera, but one that fails to capture the best-in-class prize for image quality.


  • The Canon EOS 70D delivers the smoothest Live View focus we've seen in a traditional D-SLR, but it can struggle to lock that focus in dim light.


  • Indeed, until we see Dual-Pixel CMOS AF inevitably make its way across the EOS range, we'd recommend the new Canon EOS 70D as the APS-C camera to go for if you're currently considering a mid-range DSLR camera. It offers a winning blend of features, performance and image quality that is hard to beat, both by its EOS brothers and other manufacturers' offerings. The new EOS 70D marks a real step forward for both Canon and the venerable SLR camera.


  • The official launch price of the Canon EOS 700D / Rebel T5i has dropped slightly compared to the previous model's full RRP, perhaps its most attractive feature when compared directly against its predecessor, especially as the STM kit lens is a better partner, especially for shooting video.


  • The Canon EOS 700D is a very capable and versatile camera that produces high quality images. It has a comprehensive feature set and affords all the control expected by enthusiast photographers while providing automatic hand-holding options for less experienced users.
    It produces images that are of very similar quality to those from the Canon 650D, although our tests reveal that they are a little noisier.


  • The Canon EOS 700D / Rebel T5i is an upgrade to the 650D almost in name only, but still combines very good image quality with a comprehensive, well-designed touchscreen interface. AF performance in live view mode and video is an improvement over early Rebel DSLRs, but still lags behind mirrorless options.